Babes Ride Out

women who ride

Sacha Braddock & her 2008 Harley Sportster 883XL | 1 Year in and a Lifetime to Go

PeopleAnya Violet

Sacha Braddock just had her 1 year moto anniversary! She didn’t grow up around bikes or have any friends that could introduce her to bikes but she found her way to a life on two wheels anyway. Through her experiences on her Harley-Davidson 883XL Sportster and her first ride to BRO6 she has found a great community of motorcyclists and a passion that will last a lifetime. Read on to get to know more about her.

babes ride out

Sacha Braddock @Sacha_braddock

How long have you been riding motorcycles and how did you get started? 

Last week, March 14th, was my first bike anniversary. For as long as I can remember I've wanted a motorcycle, I was not raised around motorcycles nor did I have anyone in my family or friend circle to introduce me to them. When I was living in Houston I decided a scooter would be my training wheels to getting a motorcycle (silly me I should have just gotten a motorcycle), so I got my license for that 150cc scooter. Finally a year ago my friend was looking to sell his bike and it happened to be perfect timing financially and I was able to buy it cash.

Why do you ride motorcycles / What do you get out of riding motorcycles? 

Honestly growing up I wanted to ride because anytime I would see a woman on a bike I could see myself on that bike. Women who rode were bad ass and strong. Now that I finally have a motorcycle I see that these women are so much more than just bad ass and strong, and being a part of such a wonderful community of women riders, getting on my bike to sum it up is simply freeing. My job requires me to spend tons of time in my car and on airplanes that when the weekend comes my goal is to not get in a car and only ride my moto!

Run us through the list of bikes you have had in your past / currently own:

My 2008 Sportster 883XL is my first and only bike, for now.

babes ride out

What first attracted you to Harley-Davidson? 

I will have to answer this question by saying what first attracted me to my particular Harley Davidson was how shiny and clean the chrome was. I always knew that I wanted a bike and when my friend rode what is now my motorcycle to the gym, I sat on it and fell in love. I began to do more research on the Sportster in particular and absolutely feel in love. Ergonomically it seems like the perfect fit for someone my height, it was just a fly looking bike that I knew I needed to have.

How did you know it was the bike for you? 

I remember asking my friend if I could cruise around the neighborhood one day after we worked out. Mind you I hadn't actually ridden a motorcycle since my safety course so the ride itself I am sure was funny to watch. For me that first ride, I just knew, this was my bike.

Tell us what it is like to ride your particular bike: 

To sum it up I would have to say powerful. Now I know my bike is an 883, but I went from an 150cc scooter to my sportser and to me it is powerful. Rolling the throttle makes you physically go faster but feeling that speed from the wind to my pipes, those 10 year old stock pipes still rip.

What made you choose your model over the other H-D models? 

I wish I had a compelling story, but in all reality all of the stars aligned and at the end was my Sportster. My friend was finally ready to sell his bike to me, I had just closed on my condo and I was able to buy this bike cash. Do not get me wrong there were plenty of bikes out there that I could have purchased but I wanted this Sportster and when everything just came together I knew this was my bike.

Any modifications? Tell us about them if so:

My bike only has a few modifications, I have Roland Sands adjustable levers because I have smaller hands. Keystone handlebars with Vans grips and I put an LED bulb in my headlight. I love the classic look of my Sportster so my next modification will be to upgrade my pipes and swap out all of my lights to LED. I need to be seen and heard!

What has been you favorite adventure you have taken on your bike? 

Babes Ride Out 6 through Joshua Tree through the park is hands down to date my favorite adventure. It was a dream come true that I didn't even know I had. Last year was my first Babes Ride out and I really didn't have much freeway experience so a few of my friends that I ride with every weekend, towed her out there for me. I am beyond grateful for those women at my camp at babes! Kim who was a Babes veteran guided us through Joshua Tree park, we cruised both sides of Pioneer town and all through 29 Palms. It was the best learning experience because I was surrounded by so many women who were helping me along the way.

babes ride out

Do you have any fun road trips planned? 

This year I am riding to Babes Ride Out 7! Thankfully my local community of women that I ride with have really been awesome and taking me out on longer freeway rides getting me ready for Babes and all the future moto adventures to come!

Tell us about your experience at Babes Ride Out?

A fucking dream come true! Babes was just about 6 months after I bought my bike and I still didn't have the time or confidence to ride that distance on the freeway so the women I ride with in long beach rented a trailer and towed my bike out for me. Being that I didn't grow up camping, naturally I had my concerns, where was I going to shower, would there be hot water and were there bugs. Lucky for me my friend was a camping and Babes professional not only did they tow my bike but I was one of the last few to check in Thursday night any my tent was all set up! Friday morning is when it really hit me, walking to "town" passing all the bikes and tents, I think I said good morning to every single babe I passed with the biggest smile on my face. I remember thinking to myself "this must be what those folks who love Disneyland feel like". Babes was my Disneyland. I met the most amazing women who really guided me on my longest rides to date. Riding through Joshua Tree 15 deep was magical to say the least. I am not a mushy woman but I probably hugged and thanked women I just met because I was simply happy to be surrounded by them.

babes ride out

Any advice for ladies who want to get started on two wheels?

Always ride your own ride. There is a whole community of women out there that you can ride with, when you are ready and even when you are not they are there. If you have no experience or decades of experience find that community, that group of riders that you have seen mashing down the freeway, they look badass and they where you were once. Have fun, I often think way too much about everything but with my bike I gear up and get out, I can ride 5 miles or 50 it doesn't matter as long as you ride. Most importantly always gear up, summer time comes, people are cruising down PCH with tank tops and Vans. It will be tempting to not wear all your gear all the time trust me. Fight that urge, there are so many companies out there with protective gear that is safe and looks great.

babes ride out

Want to learn how to ride? Harley-Davidson has riding schools across the US! Click HERE to see where you can sign up and take a step to changing your life <3

Take an Oath to Look Twice for Motorcycles

SafetyAnya Violet

My name is Anya and I am one of the co-founders of Babes Ride Out. Last year I was in a very serious motorcycle accident from which I am still recovering. Never have I experienced so much love and support from my family, friends, and community as a whole. Through this experience, we at Babes Ride Out want to do our part to help spread a very important message.

Look Twice for Motorcycles!

We have partnered with one of our favorite organizations Moto F.A.M. to create the “Keep on Rippin’” tee and the “Look Twice” pin. By wearing these items you have taken an oath to always look twice for motorcycles each and every time you ride or drive. The more we talk about this responsibility the more lives we can save. By purchasing these items you are already helping as 100% of the proceeds will be donated to helping riders facing life changing injuries after a serious motorcycle accident through Moto F.A.M. Thank you for supporting all that share the road. Artwork by Jerimy Lumia

To purchase for yourself, family member, co worker, or friend, click HERE.

Babes in Borrego & The Original 50 | Meet Britt Germann

PeopleAnya Violet

Britt Germann has not missed a Babes Ride Out event yet! She is one of the original 50 women who rode out with us 5 years ago to Babes in Borrego! She’s been riding since she was a teenager and in her words “ female rider were few and far between back then”. The BRO community has carved out a special place in her heart over the years “I get shy around people sometimes, though shared experiences, particularly the really special shared experiences - can be like a powerful hug pulling people close. Babes Ride Out is like that.” Read on to learn more about Britt! See you next week at BRO6!

babes ride out
babes ride out

On October 5th 2013, 50 women rode out to an undisclosed location for a night of camping and camaraderie. What would follow could not have been predicted by anyone. The positivity, passion and enthusiasm for those 50 women has fueled the growth and exposure of a community that has meant so much to so many. We are highlighting each of those 50 women and sharing their stories over the past 5 years. 


Britt Germann


babes ride out

· FULL NAME - Britt Germann

· INSTAGRAM HANDLE - @brittgermann

· LOCATION - Los Angeles, CA

· OCCUPATION - Art Dealer

How did you find out about Babes in Borrego and what made you want to be a part of it? Well, @blondezillagirl said I’d be missing out if I didn’t come. I was pretty new to LA - from Canada -  I was excited to explore Socal + meet other women who ride. Plus, I love camping.

When you arrived at the meet up, what were your first thoughts? Happy - tons of women riders, and everybody was excited. The buzz was real, big smiles all around.

Did you know anyone there? Is going on an adventure solo like this something you do or was this a first time out of your element kind of thing? I knew three people prior @blondezillagirl, @gringo_luva + @littlelindseymarie. Almost everybody, everywhere, in California were new to me at that time, and many of the 50 came from outside of LA - the experience was a new one in many ways! I have been riding motorcycles since I was a teenager in different parts of Canada, including the Pacific Coastal Mountain Range, where the season is short, wet and cold - women motorcyclists were few and far between.

To go to something like this and the destination be unknown is kind of crazy.  What did you think of riding with all those ladies and of the destination? It was exciting, I got the feeling pretty much right away that the group + it's leads, knew what they were doing on the road so the camping part should be a no-brainer. It can be dangerous to ride with people you don't know. At times, other riders do not know what they are doing though this group was on their game, and it is a serious game. As @littlelindseymarie has said...'it isn't Bingo..it's Motorcycle Riding...!'

What was that one night like for you? Tell us about your experience. I  remember getting to the camp out, and as twilight grew, some of the women jumped back on their bikes and were ripping, and I mean fast, back and forth across the dry lake bed - leather bikini tops, hair flying. It made me nervous, and I tried to stop watching. Even so, it was great, I can still smell the freedom in the air. I hope to never forget that.

Tell us about the ladies you met and have your friendships have evolved over the past 5 years.  Do you keep in touch? I have made a few good friends because of that night, for sure. I remember Sonora Jack - https://dirtyfree.blogspot.com/ - showing up in the wee hours that night - saw a single tiny headlight drive by and double back, then pick it's way on the dirt road toward the bonfire.  I could not believe my eyes....who is that? She must be thirsty ! - we grabbed cold ones and ran toward her, she'd just pulled in from AZ. I think she'd had a flat along the way, unreal that she found us! I get shy around people sometimes, though shared experiences, particularly the really special shared experiences - can be like a powerful hug pulling people close. Babes Ride Out is like that.

How have you changed over the past 5 years? (jobs, relationship, location, family, feel free to tell us as little or much as you want here) Lots of changes, loving LA - thank you, Angelenos. Working on a gallery project, it looks like we are opening in LA, next year.

Have you gone on any more camping / riding trips since that 2013 ride? If so, where and with who? Haven't missed a Babes Ride Out, and hope not to. I like to ride day trips in Malibu + Hwy 2, in Angeles Crest National Forest. Can recall this minute an epic trip to Palomar one wet summer day + Big Wheel/Little Wheel camp outs w The Cretins! Love those guys. 

What is it like coming back to Babes Ride Out as it has grown?  It's been really interesting to see massive growth, in both Babes Ride Out + the Women's Moto Movement at the same time - Babes Ride Out has helped fuel growth in the Women’s Moto Movement. I sometimes see a woman on the sidewalk or in a car, looking wistfully as my bike rolls by, because motorcycle riding not only looks cool, it is a really exhilarating sport, it is just great. Sometimes, I think to myself that I don't know which I like more, the motorcycles or the motorcycle riders, and I'm just glad I don't have to choose.

I must also say, I try never to forget that Motorcycle riding is sometimes without warning, a very scary and deadly sport. I try to remember that when I get on a motorcycle I may never get off that motorcycle. Sometimes, I wonder if riding motorcycles comfortably requires a touch of stupidity, or something close, especially when I'm in a car watching riders hurdle down the highway. Which I love to do. I ask my friends and family to know that if I die, or get close, doing this, know that I loved it and knew the risks.

What are your thoughts on the Moto community and industry as a whole? I try to encourage women to come to Babes Ride Out even if they are only thinking or wishing that they rode. Anya and Ashmore have created a really wonderful and welcoming community, in founding Babes Ride Out. It takes a long time to learn how to ride, and ride comfortably, for some people. It is ok. People need to take time with this sport. Babes Ride Out is a great place for women to ask questions and seek answers, to meet people, to make friends, to learn more about bikes and riding. I ski a lot, and motorcycling riding is a lot like skiing, if I see someone with their gear, or someone sees me, it's an instant hello. It's really nice.


  

Babes in Borrego & The Original 50 | Meet Nina Kaplan

People, Roll CallAnya Violet

We connected with Nina over instagram before Babes in Borrego was even born. In fact, connecting with her was one of the reasons we thought maybe we should extend the invite to more women we were meeting on social media. From day #1 Nina has been an encouraging, inspiring, and truly awesome fixture in this community. Her passion for a life on two wheels is intoxicating and her positive state of mind and welcoming energy make you just want to be around her. Five years later we look back and are so thankful to have met Nina on that dry lake bed in the middle of nowhere at our first ever camp out. Read on to get to know Nina!

photo by Heidi Zumbrun

photo by Heidi Zumbrun

babes ride out

On October 5th 2013, 50 women rode out to an undisclosed location for a night of camping and camaraderie. What would follow could not have been predicted by anyone. The positivity, passion and enthusiasm for those 50 women has fueled the growth and exposure of a community that has meant so much to so many. We are highlighting each of those 50 women and sharing their stories over the past 5 years. 


Nina Kaplan


photo by Heidi Zumbrun

photo by Heidi Zumbrun

·       FULL NAME  NINA KAPLAN

·       INSTAGRAM HANDLE @niinhellhound

·       LOCATION Los Angeles

·       OCCUPATION Occupational Therapist

How did you find out about Babes in Borrego and what made you want to be a part of it?

As social media connected more and more women on motorcycles in 2013, I became aware of Anya and Ashmore, via a mutual photographer friend. We sent some messages back and forth, and I was invited to scout the site in Borrego with them for the first ever BABES RIDE OUT. Due to work commitments, I was unable to scout, however I was intent on going to the event. I had purchased my first motorcycle in 2011 and found some women to ride with in the SF bay area. I was keen to meet a group in LA as I had just relocated south.

When you arrived at the meet up, what was your first thoughts?

When I arrived at the meet up at the Starbucks in Temecula I think, I remember thinking, there’s a lot of us ladies on motos here! This is going to be a great weekend adventure.

Did you know anyone there? Is going on an adventure solo like this something you do or was this a first time out of your element kind of thing?

I did go to the event with two women rider friends I rode in the Bay area with, one of whom had recently moved to So Cal as well. Via social media, I was also connected to a crew of women from Portland were making the trek down for the event. One can feel out of their element in a new group scenario, but I tend to thrive and seek out those exact types of experiences. I love the opportunity to do and be involved in something new.

To go to something like this and the destination be unknown is kind of crazy.  What did you think of riding with all those ladies and of the destination?

Riding in a group is always tough, especially a group of unknown riders. I was fortunate to have some familiar friends with me, whom I stuck with for the ride. There were instances of passing, and going around riders who were inexperienced. We wove our way near the front, and I remember as we crested the hill and looked over into the Borrego Springs Valley, what an amazing view and feeling it was! The coordinates took us to a dirt road, which in reality was a mile or so of soft sand. The kind of sand that is like snow, it just so soft. It was wild to ride down that road together, going slow and helping others who had wiped out.

What was that one night like for you? Tell us about your experience.

I remember getting into the valley with the dry lake bed where camp would be. I had been speaking to a few other MOTO ladies from Portland and I was excited to connect with them and some friends that had ridden out from NY. As the sun set the ladies took to their bikes, and I remember them ripping around an oval on the dry lake bed in the golden hours of the day. I took a quiet moment by myself to take it all in. I thought here I am with the wild women, right where we belong. Off the grid, many of us not know to each other at that time, but sharing the common mentality of adventure and comradery, and even without knowing the other women well or at all, there was a sense that we were there to support each other. It was a powerful feeling to be immediately connected to so many like minded women.

Tell us about the ladies you met and have your friendships have evolved over the past 5 years.  Do you keep in touch?

I met so ladies on this trip, many whom I developed deep and lasting friendships with. Friendships that have taken me across the country in the US and on adventure moto trips in Guatemala. The connections made in year one are some of most cherished. I return to the even every year to continue to make new connections.

How have you changed over the past 5 years?

So much has changed for me in the years since the first event, as life is ever-changing. Something I am most excited about developing in the years since the first event is my involvement in the BRO DIRT event. I have attended for 3 years and finally was able to bring a dirt bike of my own to the last event. I am excited to make the same connections and deepen friendships with the ladies that ride dirt.

Have you gone on any more camping / riding trips since that 2013 ride? If so, where and with who?

In 2015 I was lucky to go across country with Harley Davidson and Lana McNaughton of the Women’s Moto Exhibit. Other riders included Jenny Czinder of (strange Vacation) whom I met at year one BRO, and Imogen Lethonen (who I attended year 2 with), and Megan who I met at year 2 as well I think.

In December of 2016 I did a 12 day self-guided moto trip in Guatemala with Leslie Padoll of BH.and.BR and Kate Unver whom I met at BRO east coast.

I was also lucky enough to attend year one of BRO east coast, as so many ladies from the east coast come out to the west coast event, I wanted to do the opposite. I rode with Kate and Leslie on this trip and it was a great experience, I love the first year of an event, it always seems to hold the most magic.

What is it like coming back to Babes Ride Out as it has grown?  

Initially the growth of the event felt foreign and a departure from the first year. However, as I have attended throughout the years, I have reveled in how many women the event attracts, and seen it as an opportunity to connect to a wider and wider group of moto women! Now the event is such an amazing production it feels like a moto festival and I love it!

What are your thoughts on the Moto community and industry as a whole?

I love being part of the women’s moto community, I feel that as the minority within the industry as a whole we hold a very valuable position and the ability to connect and bond with each other at events such as BRO is very important.  

Artist Series | Christina Platis

Artist SeriesAnya Violet

Christina Platis has been contributing to the Babes Ride Out Artist Series since day 1! Each year she creates such amazing custom works of art and it has been an honor to have her involved! This year she created an insane custom painted Biltwell Gringo S for the Moto FAM X BRO raffle! You can also find her in the tattoo room laying down ink all weekend at BRO6! Read on to hear more about Christina!

babes ride out
babes ride out

Name: Christina Platis  @tattoosbytina

Where are you from originally? Southern CA

Where do you live now? Portland, OR

What first got you into art? I couldn’t tell you, because I’ve been doing it for as long as I can remember.

How would you describe your style? Classic American traditional tattoos mixed with feminine botanical styles.

What inspires you? Have any artists in particular been an influence on you? Tattoo imagery, it  basically consumes my creative mind. I’m very inspired by the classic art from Paul Rogers and Milton Zeis.

What is your favorite medium? Watercolor and 1shot

When did you first hear about Babes Ride Out? I was invited to go to Babes in Borrego but life got in the way and I wasn’t able to attend. Made it my goal to attend the following year in Joshua Tree.

What is your connection to the motorcycle community? Riding, tattooing, painting motorcycle helmets-all connect me to this awesome community.

Do you ride? If so, what do you ride? Yes, I ride a custom ‘98 HD Sportster

If you were a motorcycle what kind would you be? Big Twin Evo Chopper.

Have you ever been to Joshua Tree? What was your experience there? Many times and it is always just as good as the first time.

What will you be contributing to this years raffle? I will be contributing a custom painted Biltwell Gringo S helmet.

Tell us about what inspired you to create it? The beautiful Southwest.

Babes in Borrego & The Original 50 | Meet Sanna Boman

PeopleAnya Violet

Sanna has always been an inspiration to us! You can truly feel her passion for riding and we love to see her put down a ton of miles on her roadtrips. She is one of the nicest people you could meet and we are so stoked that she was with us at our first ever campout! read on to hear her story! “I can honestly say that the original Babes in Borrego event was one of the best experiences of my life. It was a super empowering experience rolling out of Temecula 50 women deep! The Sand Diego crew have since become some of my best friends and we've attended every BRO since together”-Sanna

babes ride out
babes ride out

On October 5th 2013, 50 women rode out to an undisclosed location for a night of camping and camaraderie. What would follow could not have been predicted by anyone. The positivity, passion and enthusiasm for those 50 women has fueled the growth and exposure of a community that has meant so much to so many. We are highlighting each of those 50 women and sharing their stories over the past 5 years. 


Sanna Boman


babes ride out

·       FULL NAME: Sanna Maria

·       INSTAGRAM HANDLE: @cylinderella

·       LOCATION: San Diego, CA

·       OCCUPATION: Managing Editor at Roadtrippers

How did you find out about Babes in Borrego and what made you want to be a part of it?

I saw the flyer on Instagram. This was in 2013, back when it was super rare to see motorcycle events targeted at women only, other than the occasional “Ladies Night” at the local Harley dealership. I had been riding for a few years and already knew a small group of women who rode, so a few of us decided to go.

When you arrived at the meet up, what was your first thoughts?

Arriving at the meet up spot in Temecula was pretty exciting. No one knew how many people were going to show up, and more and more ladies just kept rolling in! We were all just mingling and introducing ourselves to new people. I don't think I realized then how many of those ladies I would actually become friends with later.

Did you know anyone there? Is going on an adventure solo like this something you do or was this a first time out of your element kind of thing?

I went with two friends, Nina and Jess, so it wasn’t a solo adventure for me. Jess had only been riding for a couple of months at this point, and she was on a little 250 Virago, but she totally kicked ass through heavy winds on the freeway and twisty mountain roads taking us down into Borrego. My Sportster wasn't running at the time (which was not at all unusual for that particular bike), so I ended up renting a newer sporty just for this trip.  

To go to something like this and the destination be unknown is kind of crazy.  What did you think of riding with all those ladies and of the destination?

I had so much fun on that ride. Everyone kind of naturally broke into three groups: faster riders in the front, slower riders in the back, and everyone else in the middle. It was a super empowering experience rolling out of Temecula 50 women deep, and then trying to keep up with the really fast, experienced ladies in the front. Arriving in Borrego was... interesting. To get to the camping spot, we had to ride through two miles of sand—and not the tightly packed kind. Girls around me were dropping left and right, but I somehow made it all the way through without incident. Good thing, since I was on a rental bike.

A few years later, when we returned to the same spot for the Babes in Borrego reunion, I was on a brand new Dyna that I had bought just a few weeks earlier and was still getting used to. That was even sketchier, but again, I somehow made it there and back without dropping my bike. Just the thought of riding that sandy stretch still gives me anxiety though.

What was that one night like for you? Tell us about your experience.

I can honestly say that the original Babes in Borrego event was one of the best experiences of my life. I wrote a fairly sentimental blog post about it on Red Rag Garage (a women’s motorcycle blog I run with my friend Katie) a while back.   

My favorite thing about that night: A bunch of fearless women ripping up and down a dry lake bed as fast as their bikes would go, without helmets or a care in the world. That was one of my biggest YOLO-moments.

Tell us about the ladies you met and have your friendships have evolved over the past 5 years.  Do you keep in touch?

Yes! I met so many amazing women that first day and night, and I keep in touch with many of them. Since I’m in San Diego and many of the other ladies are in the LA and Orange County areas, I don’t get to see them as much as I would like. But the San Diego people I didn't already know (Stacey, Stayc, Tasha, Dannielle) have now become some of my best friends, and we've attended every BRO since together. And it’s always like a mini reunion when we run into the rest of the OGs at other events all over Southern California.

I've also added a few Borrego-girls to my list of travel buddies, like Genevieve. We attempted to ride to the Grand Canyon together a few years ago, but got snowed in in Flagstaff. We also rode down to San Felipe in Mexico earlier this year with a couple of other friends.

How have you changed over the past 5 years? (jobs, relationship, location, family, feel free to tell us as little or much as you want here).

Oh man, what hasn't changed? In the past five years I’ve managed to meet the love of my life, land two awesome jobs, travel to 10 countries, ride motorcycles in three continents, own a total of five different bikes, and meet some of the best friends I’ve ever had. I also just started my dream job, as managing editor at Roadtrippers. Even if the world is falling apart around us, the past five years have been kind to me personally.  

Have you gone on any more camping / riding trips since that 2013 ride? If so, where and with who?

Oh yes, I go on motorcycle road trips as often as I possibly can. I have a really awesome group of about 10 friends here in San Diego who all ride, and we travel together both on and off the bikes. Most weekends we’ll rip out to the desert or down to Mexico. Four of us just got back from a two-week, 4300-mile motorcycle trip from San Diego to Banff National Park in Canada and back. It was an amazing, bucket-list experience, and I’m already itching to plan my next trip.

What is it like coming back to Babes Ride Out as it has grown?  

I’ve been to every west coast Babes Ride Out since the first one, and it’s been amazing to see it grow into what it is today. I just love how this one event has sparked a whole new generation of women motorcyclists. I know of so many ladies who started riding after seeing how much fun we were all having at Babes, and it’s such a cool thing to have been a part of. Representation matters!

What are your thoughts on the Moto community and industry as a whole?

I have a lot of thoughts on the moto industry, how much time do you have? No, but seriously, I feel like we’re in this moment in time where there’s a generational shift happening in this scene right in front of our eyes. There's still your stereotypical ultra-sexist macho biker dude who wants women to sit quietly on the back of the bike, but I think (and hope) they’re a dying breed. The people I know who put down the most miles on their bikes are all women.

babes ride out