Babes Ride Out

red wing womens

The All New Red Wing Heritage Womens Round Toe Boot

REVIEWS, SponsorsAnya Violet
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“So many of us have been loving the women’s collection of Red Wing Heritage. The women’s fit and slight refinement of the men’s styles without lowering the leather or manufacturing standards has made styles like the 6” Moc Toe, the Clara and the Iron Ranger “go to” boots for us riders. 

Since Fall 2018 is upon us we get to be first to see the brand new women’s Round Toe which will be available in Black Boundary, Copper Rough and Tough, and Colorado Atanado. 

Originally developed for farmers, Red Wing introduced the 6-Inch Round Toe work boot in 1919, making it one of our oldest models. The round toe eliminates the need for extra stitching, and the Traction Tred outsole was added in the 1950s for improved mud-shedding grip. Durable and well-designed, the Round Toe combines the comfort of an oxford with the strength of a work boot in a style that dates back almost a century.”

A Personal Look into My Riding Gear

REVIEWSAshmore Ellis

I have never been a thrill seeker rather I find the "fun" in motorcycling in long sweeping turns with views of national forest and lakes. Since my favorite rides and destinations are determined on campsites and scenic routes in search of food, I've had to really dial in my gear over the years to be functional and diverse in any riding situation. This isn't a sales pitch or an advertisement, but what I personally ride in and have invested in with my own scruples that have held up through some pretty sticky situations (<--- that is a BBQ sauce joke) - Ashmore 

HELMET: Full face. I used to ride in a 3/4 but after riding an entire summer with chin protection, I don't think I can go back cause it feels like I am way too exposed. I've been wearing the Biltwell Gringo S ($199) for over a year and added a black with chrome shield that flips up for $35 for extra. Something about this helmet always makes me feel so cool (even though I'm not) when wearing it blacked out  because it's not over designed but functionally designed. I slapped a Prince sticker ($3.00) on the side of it cause why not? Also, you can choose a ton of different shields to mix and match your scoot or vibe. It's an incredible helmet at a great price. Total head protection $237

Biltwell Gringo S $199

Biltwell Gringo S $199

GLOVES: I've had the same gloves for 4 years, the Moto gloves via Biltwell. They smell terrible at this point but dry fast, break in nicely, and fit my hands perfectly. I probably should wash them. Price $29.95

Biltwell Moto Gloves $29.99&nbsp;

Biltwell Moto Gloves $29.99 

PANTS: Up until this past year, I'd been wearing Urban Outfitter skinny jeans which are similar to tights. I traded them in for the ATWYLD Commuter Moto Jeans which are lined with kevlar and have enough stretch in them to give a little after taking down a plate of ribs. When I ride a day or even 10 straight, I only bring 1 pair of pants, the ones I have on. These can take the stank, grease, grimes, and BBQ sauce. Price $310

ATWYLD Commuter Moto Jeans $310&nbsp;

ATWYLD Commuter Moto Jeans $310 

JACKET/TOP: Layers, my favorite. I typically ride in a leather jacket I picked up forever ago or the Convoyed Armored Shirt by ATWYLD depending on weather. I wear the armored shirt under my flannel, military jacket, or crew neck sweater. It wicks away the moisture so it dries fast and you don't overheat. The armour in the shirt keeps you protected at impact zones so when I don't feel like wearing my leather jacket, this is my go to. Armored Shirt $175, I won't tell you how much I paid for my leather jacket #insaneeeeeeee

Hot Tip: Also check out ATWYLD's Navigate Fleece. It's lined with Kevlar and has a solid crew neck sweater fit. Dual use gear is the  B E S T ! It's next on my wish list. 

ATWYLD's Convoyed Armored Shirt $175&nbsp;

ATWYLD's Convoyed Armored Shirt $175 

SHOES: One time I wore a pair of Sanuks (1 step up from a flip flop) on my Yamaha. I ripped the entire sole off going 35mph. It sucked and it hurt. I then tried Ariats which were great just not on the bike as the leather is much thinner than it looks so my shifting foot was getting worked. I landed on Red Wing Heritage Boots when they came out with their women's line and was sold on the  Iron Rangers. They quickly became my favorite riding boot because of the comfort and durability. The rubber on the bottom has a great grip too which is always nice when you step in a bit of oil while waiting for the light to turn green. RWH Iron Ranger $319

Red Wing Heritage Women's Iron Rangers $319.99

Red Wing Heritage Women's Iron Rangers $319.99

Each person is different and finding the right gear is important so take your time and ask questions if you are unsure on fit and function. Quality and protection is never cheap because these items are designed to last and protect you and girl, you are so worth it! 

Love, Ashmore 

Red Wing Heritage Womens Collection

SponsorsAnya Violet
Iron Ranger, Short Engineer, and Moc Toe from the Core Collection; photo credit Claire Sheprow

Iron Ranger, Short Engineer, and Moc Toe from the Core Collection; photo credit Claire Sheprow

Introducing the Red Wing Heritage Women’s Collection and the women behind it

There was a time when only men wore trousers. But that changed in the early 20th century when women traded their dresses and skirts for long pants. That’s because pants are simply better for riding motorcycles, climbing mountains, or flying airplanes, things women started doing with greater frequency. These were the same strong women who fought for voting rights and worked in factories during two World Wars. In the 1920s, Red Wing Shoe Company started selling women’s shoes and boots that were up to the rigors of these new feminine adventures—rugged and functional, redefining what was “lady-like”. Now they’re doing it again. Introducing the Women’s Collection from Red Wing Heritage.

Barn Buff, Red Wing, MN 1938 featuring the original Gloria boot. Photo curtesy of Red Wing Show Co. Archives

Barn Buff, Red Wing, MN 1938 featuring the original Gloria boot. Photo curtesy of Red Wing Show Co. Archives

The new Women’s Collection not only pays tribute to their 20th century history, but is also inspired by the independent women of today. The collection is made up of three distinct families. The Legacy boots are directly inspired by two boots Red Wing made in the early 20th century—tall, rugged and refined. The Modern collection reinterprets classic shapes—a chukka, a Chelsea, and a lace-up—with a stacked leather heel and feminine lines, which make them both practical and stylish. And finally, the Core boots take classics from the men’s line that women have long cherished, and cut them leaner and more comfortable for a woman’s foot while keeping the legendary Red Wing toughness.

Clara and Lillian from the Modern Collection, Red Wing Heritage

Clara and Lillian from the Modern Collection, Red Wing Heritage

All of the boots in the Women’s Collection retain the hallmarks that made Red Wing who they are. All the boots are stitched together for unsurpassed durability, with top quality leathers from their own S.B. Foot tannery, using Goodyear welt construction that makes them stronger and re-soleable for a lifetime of wear.

When Red Wing decided to create the Women’s Collection, they knew the perfect person to spearhead its development: Allison Gettings. Allison embodies all that is a Red Wing woman—literally. Her great-grandfather, grandfather, and father have all taken a turn at the helm of Red Wing Shoe Company since the 1920s. Allison remembers visiting the offices and factories as a child, no doubt smelling the leathers and hearing the machines that have long been used to skive, stitch and nail boots together. Two years ago Allison was tasked with the launch of the Women’s Collection, a job for which she was seemingly born and, after ten years working at Red Wing, a challenge she was ready to take on.

Allison Gettings, Director of Product Creation Red Wing Heritage

Allison Gettings, Director of Product Creation Red Wing Heritage

“We wanted to start with a tight collection that has really strong ties to our Red Wing DNA,” Allison says, “but we wanted to have a large enough collection with enough gravity that would appeal to customers who know Red Wing, but also those who are maybe new to the brand.”

Allison points to the Gloria boot as an entry point to the women’s line, a tall lace-up that pays homage to the first boot Red Wing made for women in 1926. “It’s important to us that we make these boots to not only look like ones we made in the past, but are actually made in the same way, with the craftsmanship and materials that we used when we first made these shoes.”

The Gloria from the Legacy Collection; Red Wing Heritage

The Gloria from the Legacy Collection; Red Wing Heritage

Of course, getting nine new styles created was a tall order and not one Allison did herself. For help, she turned to talented designer, Gaal Levine, to start penning the new boots. Gaal drew from her experience in footwear design but also found inspiration in Red Wing’s company archives.

Gaal Levine, Women's Product Designer, Red Wing Heritage

Gaal Levine, Women's Product Designer, Red Wing Heritage

“When I first came here, I spent some time doing a deep dive in the archives, looking through old catalogs to see what made sense to bring back.” Gaal counts herself as lucky to work for a footwear company that has its own company archivist. And its own tannery. During the design and prototyping phase, Gaal and Allison were able to talk to the master tanner at S.B. Foot about what was possible—new colors and leathers that suited the unique requirements of building boots for women.

Women have long favored Red Wing boots and often would wear the men’s boots in smaller sizes. But the new collection is designed just for them, with lighter weight and softer leathers, more cushioned fiber insoles, and built around all new lasts that are tailored for women’s feet. So while the Engineer, Iron Ranger and Moc Toe of the new Core collection may look like their masculine counterparts, they’re entirely feminine, from the ground up.

Iron Ranger; photo credit Claire Sheprow

Iron Ranger; photo credit Claire Sheprow

While the Women’s Collection is new to Red Wing Heritage, making women’s shoes is not new to Red Wing. 90 years after they made their first boots for strong, independent women, they’re making them again, just as tough and beautiful as ever. Just like the women they are made for.

Moc Toe; photo credit Claire Sheprow

Moc Toe; photo credit Claire Sheprow