Babes Ride Out

Safety

Ride Safe, Have Fun

SafetyAnya Violet

Babes Ride Out 7 is next week!!! We are so excited and can’t wait to see you all roll in to camp. Let’s make sure that everyone gets there safely! We have compiled some helpful info on how to stay safe!

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Practice

The importance of practicing to make sure you are ready for the roads you might encounter

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Ride your own ride

Riding at your own comfortable pace

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Riding in a Group

Know the proper etiquette

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Tips for New Riders

Everyone finds their way to two wheels a different way. Make sure the path is your own

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First Responder

Advice on what to do if you see a rider down

How to Safely Pack Your Bike

Riding with a loaded bike does feel different so make sure to get a feel for it before you set out

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Tips for riding in the wind

It’s good to be prepared for anything

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Getting used to the bike you are going to ride

Just a reminder to make sure to spend some time getting used to the bike you are going to ride, as you are going to ride it before you set out on a long road trip.

SENA Demos at Babes Ride Out 7 x Are You Riding Connected?

Safety, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

Sena is back for Babes Ride Out 7! The leader in motorcycle and action sports smart communication devices, Sena will be on-site to show you all the latest and greatest tech, with the opportunity to experience riding connected yourself with SF2 demo headset units. You can pre-register for a demo unit here or on a first-come, first-serve basis on Friday at our booth! You’ll have all of Saturday to experience the device in the open highways of the California Central Coast before returning it that evening.

What are we packing for this trip? Whether you want to listen to your music on the go or you want to talk with your riding buddies on the open road, Sena aims to keep riders connected. A few of the units we’re bringing with us are the following:

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  • Are you the type to record your adventures? The 10C Pro houses 4-way Bluetooth communication with a built-in camera to record the adventure. Want to share it on your favorite social media platform? Connect with your phone using the camera’s WiFi and post the content from wherever you’re at!

Babes Ride Out

  • The 10C EVO takes video recording to the next level by capturing video in 4K at 30FPS.  With Smart Audio Mix, you can record your group’s conversation via Bluetooth intercom alongside your highlight reel! Just like the 10C Pro, connect to the camera via a smartphone app and download the video on to your phone.

Babes Ride Out x Central Coast

  • The 30K features open mesh intercom, allowing a virtually unlimited amount of nearby riders to connect with a single click. The 30K also features 4-way Bluetooth intercom if you want to keep your conversation within a dedicated small group.

Photo credit: Heidi Zumburn

Photo credit: Heidi Zumburn

  • The Sena SF Series features a sleek 3-button system, perfect for those who prefer a slimmer device. you can experience the SF2 for yourself through our BRO 7 demo program. Pre-register here to make sure a unit is waiting for you when you arrive on Friday!


Even if you don’t get the opportunity to demo (or, you already have your own piece of Sena gear!), we hope you’ll stop by the Sena booth and say Hi!

Introducing On-Site Camping Gear Rental Partner Arrive Outdoors

DIY Tips, Events, Safety, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

For many riders, camping off the bike is still very new (and that’s ok!). It took me years to dial in my camping kit and learn how to safely pack it on the back of my motorcycle efficiently. For those novice moto campers, or those who have old outdated gear, or don’t want to bother with packing all their crap, we decided to partner with a quality outdoor rental company, Arrive, that rents all sorts of camping gear and will be on site to distribute it to you when you…well… arrive. Make sure to reserve your gear early cause they will sell out of many of the tents, sleeping bags, pads, camp chairs….you get the picture.

How do I reserve my gear to be on site to pick up when I arrive?

When you order gear from Arrive, use code “BRO” at checkout and choose warehouse pickup. You’ll see the Arrive booth upon entering the gates for the event. All you need to do is bring your ID to their tent , after you are parked in your zone, and pick up your items! Please note that you are responsible for setting up, breaking down, and of course returning rental gear to their booth by 10:00AM Sunday morning.

Click HERE to get started as all items must be pre-booked through their website prior to the event.

Now you can travel to the Central Coast without all your camping gear strapped to the back of your motorcycle (which can be pretty dangerous if you’ve never packed your gear before and tested it out. You’d be amazed how quickly items shake out and into your power band which causes an immediate HALT ( not fun)).

About Arrive

A little about our partner - Arrive is an outdoor experience company that is transforming the outdoor industry into an easier and more sustainable model. The main goal of Arrive is to help people experience the outdoors without the burden of buying, cleaning and storing gear. Arrive partners directly with over 40 premium outdoor gear brands to offer their gear for rent, everything from tents and sleeping bags to stoves, headlamps, and blankets! If you have any questions about what you’ll need at Babes Ride Out, just give them a call at 213 534-8852.



Is it Time to Replace Your Helmet? Probably!

Safety, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

We don’t want to start on the risk of riding, we all know the statistics and stories, instead, we want to focus on how to best equip yourself with protection that lessens the risk at a cost effective price. On today's blog we focus on the most important aspect, your helmet, and when you need to start thinking about replacing it by reviewing how it should fit, and warning signs to look for with our good friends Biltwell Inc.

Helmet choices are vast but I keep going back to Biltwell for many many reasons. First , they make a great looking and fitting DOT full face starting at $175 and second, they have a myriad of colorful optics to pair with it (anti fog, mirrored, shields, goggles, etc) to customize your look. A good rule of thumb is to replace your helmet every 5 years depending on wear and tear. Of course, if you have gone down and the helmet is scratched or damaged in any way, you’d want to replace immediately to be on the safe side. Other factors that come from frequent use are the not so glamorous sweat factory you’ve created in your helmet, or having product in your hair, etc which can compact the foam and degenerate the liner faster than normal use. My third reason for choosing Biltwell is they also make a replaceable liner and replaceable cheek pads for their helmets (under $30 for liners, under $15 for cheek) which makes your money go further when buying one of their lids long term.

So the next time you walk out to your garage put your helmet on and give your head a shake. Does it feel a loose at all (around cheeks, forehead, etc)? Are there any gashes, cracks, etc? Is the interior padding deteriorated or compressed at all? Have you had it more than 5 years? If the answer is YES to any one of these, it may be time to treat yourself and upgrade to a brand new helmet.

A Note About Helmet Fitment

Helmets comes in all sorts of shapes and sizes. Just because you are a medium in one doesn’t mean you won’t be a larger or smaller size in another. It’s best to consult a professional if you are having issues determining your size. Biltwell also offer cheek pads in various sizes to help fine tune your fit if necessary. Give them a call or stop into their headquarters if you need any help at all.

  • Bilwell Inc. 2349 Winchester Rd, Temecula, California

  • Get Directions

  • Or call (951) 699-1500

In Other News

In the spirit of their motto ride motorcycles have fun, Biltwell hosts their annual Kernville Kampout early Oct. If you are one for hitting fun events with like minded people, check out this year’s line up (then make sure to join us the weekend after at Babes Ride Out 7 on the Central Coast of California!



ATWYLD | Put a Layer Between You and The Road

SafetyAnya Violet

For many, it is so easy to just hop on your bike wearing whatever comfortable clothes you happen to put on that day. What if we told you that you can still do that and have CE Level 1 impact protection and abrasion resistance in case things don’t go as planned. ATWYLD has designed full collection of riding gear for the modern female motorcyclist. It looks good and wears well on and off the bike. Check it out!

photo by John Ryan @commonbloodmoto

photo by John Ryan @commonbloodmoto

Built for the Modern Woman That Rides!

ATWYLD has the best riding jeans in the business! Road tested and rider approved for comfort, quality and duability. Put a protective layer between you and the road!

SHRED 2.O MOTO JEANS

  • Stretch Denim

  • UV Coated Leather panels

  • DuPont Kevlar Lining

  • Removable D3O knee and hip armor

VOYAGER MOTO JEANS

  • Stretch Denim

  • DuPont Kevlar Lining

  • Removable D3O knee and hip armor

RAVEN MOTO JEANS

  • Super Stretch Denim

  • Dupont Kevlar Linin

Photo by Genevieve Davis

Photo by Genevieve Davis

Photo By Mike Pham

Photo By Mike Pham

The Ultimate Packing List for Babes Ride Out East Coast

DIY Tips, Events, SafetyAshmore Ellis

Packing for a weekend away on your motorcycle can be a little intimidating if it's your first time especially when rolling to the Catskills which is notorious for having unexpected weather. Will you screw up and forget something important? Probably but hey, that's the fun of it and we've never heard of anyone self destructing if they've forgotten their toothpaste. If you have not taken a few minutes to familiarize yourself with where the event is, do so now. View where the closest gas station, grocery store, restaurants, hardware stores, and where the closest mechanic is located whom has business hours over the weekend. As you can see, town is walking distance and has some incredible restaurants and a grocery store for anyone who has special needs or wants to enjoy the quaint township. Click below to educate yourself on these things. 

69 De Mauro Lane, Narrowsburg NY

Babes Ride Out

 

Ok! Now that you have read the yelp reviews of The Heron (spicy grits are N U T S). Lets discuss how to SAFELY pack your bike. For this, we ask one of our favorite road dogs, Bill Bryant of Biltwell his tips and tricks. Take note, share with friends, this is a good one.

How to Safely Pack Your Motorcycle by Bill Bryant of Biltwell

The primary goal when packing for a multi day riding trip is to not be killed by all the bullshit you strap to your motorcycle. I’ve dodged more than my share of tools, water bottles and other dangerous debris riding behind friends over the years and lost a few bits of my own along the way. Here’s a couple tips that might make things safer and more convenient for you and the people following behind you.

In the military, people who can’t keep their shit together get nicknamed “Yard Sale” or “Soup Sandwich”. To avoid ending up with one of these embarrassing monikers, one has to learn to bring only what’s needed and not be in a hurry to pack it.

1. Safety

If your gear feels loose, it is. You should be able to grab anything strapped to your bike and give it a decent tug. If it easily moves around, that’s what it’s going to do once you hit the road. Use high quality straps, and avoid bungees for anything major or heavy. There’s nothing wrong with deploying more straps than you need. They may come in handy later anyway. Think of the amount of air pushing on all that gear as you blast down the highway for hours at a time. Make sure all zippers and closures are tight, and face them away from the wind if possible. Recheck your load at every stop. Tighten down straps, look for loose ends dangling near the tire, etc. Your wheels and chain are hungry. More than one chopper hero has gone down when their shit got caught in the back sprocket. I’ve seen a single pair of surf trunks bring a bike to an immediate halt in the middle of a Mexican highway (Marco, you out there?) Likewise, a sloppy jacket hastily bungeed on a sissy bar jammed up in the rear wheel so hard once that we had to remove the wheel to get it out (remember that one, Eddie?). Make sure any loose ends on straps are tied up tight and can not rub against any of the spinning bits. Use the buddy system and always keep an eye on your riding partner’s gear, and make sure they are watching yours. If you see something getting loose or close to the wheel, lopsided, etc, wave ‘em over so they can fix it. That small hassle is way better than a big one if the offending gear gets wrapped around your chain at 80mph. Distribute the load as low and evenly as possible. Keep the heavy stuff like tools down low as possible to avoid changing the dynamic of the bike. Heavy stuff up high always tries to work it’s downward or off to one side, so pack it low and symmetrical. If you put all the weight on one side, it’ll all be hanging off in an hour. Put some stuff up on the bars/risers where you can see it, but not too much or it’ll affect the way the bike handles. Don’t put so much up there that you have a hard time seeing over/around it. That may sound dumb, but I’ve done it myself, so I know it’s possible. Doh! Reduce your kit. One of the best pre­flight measures you can take is to spread out all your gear on the floor or workbench before loading it. Then put about half of it back where you got it. The less you bring, the better your chances of keeping it all together. Share the load with your buddies if you are riding with friends. Chances are a group of four riders doesn’t need four individual stoves, so divvy up stuff like that instead of bringing more than the group needs.

2. Levels of Storage

Being able to access what you need with the least amount of hassle on the road is a skill that takes a little forethought. Dividing it all up into levels of storage reduces the chance of losing something or digging to the bottom of an otherwise nicely packed bag. Here’s the way I do it:

A) Immediate : This is the stuff I can grab without opening anything. It’s what I keep clipped on the outside of my bag or on my person: wallet, registration paperwork, multi­tool, pocket knife, sunscreen, phone, flash light, sun glasses and clears, shop rag or bandana, smokes, lighter. I usually wear a vest on a trip, not so much for fashion (I’m helpless in that department anyway) but so I can have all this crap on me and not sitting on any of it. No one wants to wait on you to get your credit card out of the bottom of a giant duffel at every gas stop and every time you dig into that gear there is a chance you’ll hurry through it and leave something undone.

B) Ready: You need to get at stuff like tools, oil, spare gas, and a water bottle with very little effort. So this stuff goes in outside pockets or top layers of your bag. I usually include a towel, trunks and flip flops in this category when weather looks nice. If there’s half a chance of rain or drastic weather changes, I’ll have rain gear and extra layers ready to go and easy to get to in a hurry. Likewise, if you start out early in the morning and need to shed layers in a couple hours, think ahead about where that stuff is going to go. I like to roll up a flannel or jacket and clip it to the front of my Exfil­7 bag on the handlebars so I can open two buckles and unroll what I need.

C) Buried: You really only need your tent, sleeping bag, food, cooking kit or change of clothes at the end of the day. This stuff can be buried a little deeper and harder to get to since you shouldn’t need it in an emergency or on the side of the road.

3. Adapt your Bike for Carrying Stuff

Build or buy a strong sissy bar and strap an appropriate amount of stuff to it. I’ve witnessed dudes putting a heavy gas can on a sissy built out of 1/2 rod and end up wearing it all a few hundred miles later when the thing gives out. Buy some decent throw over saddlebags and make sure they have mounts that keep ‘em out of the rear wheel. If you have a stock­ish bike, there are usually lots of aftermarket racks available. You need to carry at least basic tools so buy a decent tool bag that won’t give out from the weight. Don’t strap to things that get hot or have sharp edges. The best way to sort your kit is to go on the longest multi-
day trip you can afford and camp along the way. By the morning of about day four you will be donating junk you didn’t really need and you will have figured out what things belong in each level of storage. Don’t be afraid to watch some weathered road dog pack their kit in the morning, you might learn a trick or two. Remember, the tighter your gear is, the more time you have to enjoy the trip. Being thoughtful about how you pack not only keeps you safe, it keeps you from earning the “Yard Sale” nickname. 

Luggage we LOVE by Biltwell! These bags strap so easily onto your motorcycle and give you the option to access anything you pack easily.



What to Pack Specifically for Babes Ride Out East Coast 4 

  • Have your bike serviced BEFORE you come to the event. Make sure that baby is tuned up and roadworthy! 

  • Add the $35 100 mile moto towing to your AAA package. It's good for a year and YES, I have had to use mine before and it's saved me a ton of cash. If you bike breaks down, this is like having a guardian angel. 

  • Russbrown BAM card. This is basically like having an angel in your back pocket for roadside assistance and we’ve used it before! It’s free to sign up for and can save you hundreds of dollars. Click HERE for your FREE membership.

  • Tent/Hammock (tons of trees at this site for shade) Make sure ALL pieces are there before you roll out to the event. Nothing is worst than a missing rain fly or pole. 

  • Sleeping Pad

  • Sleeping Bag

  • Headlamp

  • Water Bottle w/ clip (we have potable water on site to fill your bottles)

  • Wet Wipes / Face wipes 

  • Pillow (camp size)

  • Camp towel (the quick drying kind that folds up super small) 

  • Extra fuel (check out Lowbrow Customs fuel canister at $19.95)

  • Warm clothes (HOT TIP! Waterproof compression sacks can fit everything you need and more)

  • Clothes for extreme heat & humidity

  • Zip ties

  • A couple of sandwich bags in case it rains and you need to create a waterproof way of carrying your iphone.

  • Trash bag to cover your seat at night

  • Rain poncho (the kind that fits in your pocket)

  • Multi tool

  • Toiletries 

  • Sunscreen

  • Tool kit / roll

  • Swimsuit

  • Flip flops (super shitty ones for the shower)

  • Bug spray... seriously, you'll want this!

  • $$ always have cash on you no matter what. A lot of times banks will cut off your card as you nickel and dime your visa at the gas pump or a state park will require a small fee. 

  • $$ for merch

  • $$ for food truck

  • $$ for coffee

  • Camera or GoPro

  • Positive mental attitude

  • Rain gear (if weather calls for it or not)

Forget something? There is a camp store on site that has everything you need. They take cash and cards :) 

Remember, weather  changes daily and is unpredictable so always be prepared. If you need to get anything, we highly recommend going to backcountry.com or REI  they have it all and you still have time to order these supplies online before the event. Happy camping! - Ashmore