Babes Ride Out

Roll Call

Roll Call | We Are Thrilled to Have Karen Davidson Attend Babes Ride Out 7 x Central Coast (Yes, THAT "Davidson")

People, Roll CallAshmore Ellis

We are thrilled to welcome Karen Davidson of the Harley-Davidson family to Babes Ride Out 7 x Central Coast. We had the pleasure of meeting her several times and can honestly say she is a genuine motorcycle riding enthusiast that is easy to talk to about any and all things two wheels. We are thrilled for you to meet her at the event, but until then, get to know Karen and what she does to push the Harley-Davidson brand forward, it’s pretty impressive!

Karen Davidson was born to ride. The great-granddaughter of Harley-Davidson's co-founder William A. Davidson, daughter of industrial design legend Willie G. Davidson, she degreed in fashion design, schooled in couture, joined the Motor Company in 1989 and was one of the original co-creators/visionaries of the Harley-Davidson MotorClothes line of apparel and accessories. She has been instrumental in the launch of high-level performance riding gear for men and women, and has been involved with the design, brand positioning and expansion of the Harley-Davidson apparel collections in the US, Europe and Asia.   As Creative Director for General Merchandise Davidson gives direction for future development of casual and functional merchandise, which in 2018 was a $240 million business. Based in Southern California and Milwaukee, Davidson enjoys riding year-round.

Karen Davidson x Babes Ride Out

What is your role as creative director for Harley-Davidson General Merchandise?

I assess macro forecasted and current trends and innovations on the casual side and the functional side of our business. On the casual side I’m really looking at macro apparel directions that involve emerging trends, fabric and silhouette proportion changes and opportunity for H-D to lead with our own uniqueness. I evaluate and choose new material, innovate function, and identify opportunities, build prototypes, everything to do with new ideas. I review apparel industry analysis and market evaluations. H-D has incredible brand strength and depth of meaning unlike other apparel brands and deserves an approach that leverages quality and innovation.  The design/production group in Milwaukee executes final product. On the functional side I can leverage my riding experience, my lifetime of riding, as we develop new designs and materials in riding gear that emphasize comfort in all elements, style and protection. Climate and conditions change when riding distance, so I value tech fabrics and innovation. I appreciate having great gear you can count on to be diverse, like our FXRG Collection.

What are your sources for inspiration? Also keeping relevant to growing diversity

We monitor trends specific to the apparel industry, casual and functional trends, current and future.  I take a deeper dive into functional apparel and invent with new technologies, specifically at a start point of finding the right partners, creating new innovation that will improve protection and comfort. I also observe the custom nature of Harley-Davidson culture and our riders. I go to many events, from national US events to local events and events in Asia and Europe, and I come away from those events with clear inspiration. H-D inspires individuality and that speaks strongly throughout the world. There’s also an on-going dialogue with the motorcycle styling department on design language and color direction.




How Harley-Davidson Riding Academy Made Courtney a More Confident Rider

People, Roll CallAshmore Ellis

Courtney has been riding for 3 years and got her start by testing the waters on her own but soon found out the at the Harley-Davidson riding clinic was a great asset to help her develop much needed technique and help her build confidence. After that first class, she felt much more comfortable on her motorcycle and plans on continuing honing in her skills with additional classes. One of the many things we love about Courtney is open to answer any questions on how to get started and connect with new riders looking for advice. Hit her up on her instagram @cocoramaaa and she’d be more than happy to connect and share her experience. Before you do, get to know her, what she’s currently building, and why she decided on a 2018 HD Street Bob as her moto of choice!

Courtney in front of the Kill Bill Church | Shot by Laura Goldenberger

Courtney in front of the Kill Bill Church | Shot by Laura Goldenberger

What you do for a living?

Co-own a full service salon

How long have you been riding motorcycles and how did you get started?

I’ve been riding for 3 years.

Why do you ride motorcycles / What do you get out of riding motorcycles?

I was tired of only getting on the bike if my dude wanted to ride. I wanted to be in control of where I was riding & wanted to feel the freedom of two wheels riding solo. Being a part of the motorcycle community is like no other & being a Lita is even more empowering by being surrounded by strong, beautiful babes!

Run us through the list of bikes you have had in your past / currently own:

I started off on a 2016 HD Sportster 1200. I upgraded to a 2018 HD Street Bob because I was tired of stopping for gas on long rides haha I just recently purchased a 1966 Triumph and currently, building an HD Breakout chopper.

What first attracted you to Harley-Davidson?

I’ve been around Harley’s all my life. I can remember the smell of the first shop we had in Lancaster and being obsessed with all the leather and fringe!

How did you know it was the bike for you?

The Bob is fantastic. I wasn’t sure about a soft tail, but the sales person assured me it wasn’t like an old soft tail and I could enjoy a long ride on it... and I do!

Tell us what it is like to ride your particular bike:

I definitely couldn’t maneuver the bob like the sporty while parking. I ended up putting an air ride on it and absolutely love it. I added a fairing and little blue tooth speakers inside and now I’m off and riding in the wind! I put an air ride on the breakout as well. It’s still getting some work done on it, but I can’t wait to rip around town on the chopper.

What made you choose your model over the other H-D models?

It’s not as small as the Sportster, but still slim and badass! It’s definitely the bike I will keep forever even if I upgrade. I love my bob.

Any modifications? Tell us about them if so:

Air ride, fairing, exhaust, speakers, foot boards and brass accessories.

What has been you favorite adventure you have taken on your bike?

Babes Ride Out 6 by far! I cannot wait until this year!

Do you have any fun road trips planned?

A group of us are going to Babes in October!

Tell us about your experience at Babes Ride Out?

EPIC! I swear I was on a high the whole week after we got back... ask my co-workers (haha)! I was all smiles and couldn’t stop posting all the fun times my friend and I had!

Any advice for ladies who want to get started on two wheels?

My first answer is: go to your local Harley-Davidson and sign up for the class. I was riding 6 months before I took the class and I cannot stress enough how confident the course made me. The afternoon that I finished the class I drove home and got straight on my bike! It’s amazing and I can’t wait to take the intermediate course that HD offers.

Click HERE to find a class near you!

Babes Ride Out


Malary Lee Proves Skill Conquers All on Her Harley-Davidson Dyna ...and her Flat Track Bike... and her Dirt Bike

Roll Call, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

When I first met Malary Lee I was immediately impressed by the way she handled a bike cause … well, she is a bit smaller. It was clear that true skill conquers all and Malary Lee had it. With 5 bikes in her garage that focus on street, flat track, and dirt, she is not planning on slowing down, in fact she is dominating races like Flat Out Friday and Dirt Quake with her Harley-Davidson. Get to know the Austin Texas local Malary Lee, and make sure to cheer her on when you see her at a race near you. She will be the one with purple hair shredding shredding it.

Photo by Malary Lee

Photo by Malary Lee

How long have you been riding motorcycles and how did you get started? 

I've been riding motorcycles for 8 years. Riding was always something I knew I wanted to do. When I finally had enough money saved up I bought a little bike.

Why do you ride motorcycles / What do you get out of riding motorcycles? 

I ride motorcycles to challenge myself outside of my comfort zone and to say yes to things that scare me. When I started riding, leaving the neighborhood scared me. Now I've ridden across the country. Then I got a dirt bike & leaving the ground was something that felt foreign. Now I push myself to see how far I can fly. I sign up for races that I know I'm not fast enough for, because in life you're never really ready for anything.. you just have to be willing to say yes. Motorcycles motivate me to push myself physically & mentally.

Run us through the list of bikes you have had in your past / currently own: 

My first bike was a cm185 - then a kz400 that I ended up trading for a km100. My dream bike was a cb350 so I bought a red one, that I eventually sold to a dad to give to his daughter for her 16th birthday. I bought a green cb350 that I moved across the country from Iowa to Texas with. The roads in Texas were faster so I purchased an 883 sportster that I upgraded to a 1200. Then I got into dirt biking, starting with a xr100, then a crf150r and finally a Ktm 250 sx-f. I sold the sportster and bought a 2000 fxdx. I currently own 5 bikes: the dyna (fxdx), my KTM, klx110, the green cb350 & another sportster 1200 I've converted into a flat track bike.

Photo by Genevieve Davis

Photo by Genevieve Davis

What first attracted you to Harley-Davidson? 

When I moved to Texas I had a cb350, but I knew I needed something bigger and faster if I wanted to ride across the country. I chose the Harley Sportster, because as someone who is 5'0 it was easy to modify for me to touch the ground & maneuver. Now that I'm more comfortable on bikes, I don't mind not being able to touch the ground. The dyna is a perfect upgrade and handles so well. My current sportster was easy to customize into a race bike. I have loved every Harley I've ever owned for different reasons.

How did you know it was the bike for you? 

I knew it was the bike for me the first time I rode it. I had the biggest smile on my face and nothing else mattered after that. I was set on leaving that day with my Harley.

Tell us what it is like to ride your particular bike: 

I can't really explain it.. I've ridden a lot of bikes and have enjoyed them all for what they are. But riding my bike, that's set up for me - that I have made my own feels like it's apart of me. When I ride my bike you can't wipe the grin off my face.

What made you choose your model over the other H-D models? 

I did some research on bike models and years - what would be easiest to find parts for and settled on something that in time would be easiest to fix if I needed, but would hold it's value.

Photo by Jenny Lindquist

Photo by Jenny Lindquist

Any modifications? Tell us about them if so:

oh man... so many. The 96 1200 sportster has been completely gone over to become a race bike. Husqvarna front end, chain conversion, new bars, seat, suspension, converted the back wheel to a 19" etc. The dyna is just normal stuff people do: custom paint, seat, bars... it's pretty :)

What has been you favorite adventure you have taken on your bike? 

My favorite adventure was my first road trip from Austin, Texas to Moab, Utah. It was in May where it's summer in Texas already, but still winter in the rest of the country. I got caught in a snow storm in the Rocky Mountains after a gas station attendant gave some incorrect directions in an out of service area. I was rescued by a ranger and escorted to a ski resort in Taos where a Winter Movie Festival was happening. The whole trip was something that in the moment I was wondering what I'd gotten myself into, but afterwards could laugh because it's all part of the adventure & now I have a really funny story.

Photo by Katie O’Connel

Photo by Katie O’Connel

Do you have any fun road trips planned? 

Currently, I'm recovering from a dirt bike crash so nothing official until I'm healed. However, I've always got ideas for adventures brewing.

Tell us about your experience at Babes Ride Out?

I attended the second year of babes ride out and a couple events since. Every one is a completely different experience & it's exactly what you make it. For me, it's about friendship & adventure. I've met so many of my best friends from going to BRO events. I would highly recommend every lady to check out at least one event.

Any advice for ladies who want to get started on two wheels?

Stop thinking about it and do it. Sign up for a course. Ask a friend who rides for help. Make the steps. You won't regret it!

Photo by Mikey Revolt

Photo by Mikey Revolt

Want to learn more about Harley-Davidson motos? Click HERE

Want to take one on a test ride? Click HERE

Lori Bentley-Law | A Modern Vagabond & Her 1200 "Chromester"

Roll CallAshmore Ellis

“Somehow twenty-five years have gone by since I got my license. How did that happen?? In high school, my boyfriend had a motorcycle. I rode with him a few times, but his goal was to scare me. I swore I’d never get on another. Then I fell in love with a life-long, third-generation motorcyclist. Through him, I found the glorious freedom of riding. It took only a couple of times on the back before I got the bug to ride my own, and have been doing so ever since.” Lori Bentley Law

Photo by Genevieve Davis

Photo by Genevieve Davis

Why do you ride: I have no deep philosophical answer to this. I ride because it’s fun. Because all of the senses come alive. Because it brings me pure joy.

Run us through the bikes in your life: Oh boy. This could get long. I still have every bike I’ve owned, except for the bike I learned on, a 1974 Honda XL175. I love vintage, so started with a ‘66 Yamaha YM1... that never wanted to run. I got a ‘77 Triumph Bonneville... that I had a heck of a time kick-starting. A ‘76 Honda TL125, a fantastic bike in the dirt. A ‘69 Triumph TR25w project bike. A 2004 Triumph Bonneville. Plus, a garage full of EVO Harley-Davidson that the hubby adopts and we share. But the motorcycle that truly has my heart is my Chromester, a 2004 Harley-Davidson 1200R, a bike I’ve had since new, and one that has taken me on the grandest adventures.

Photo by Cindy DuLong

Photo by Cindy DuLong

Funny thing, I had to be talked into riding a Harley-Davidson. Vintage Triumphs had my heart. My hubby kept saying I needed to ride a Harley-Davidson to understand, but I was stubborn. Finally, he surprised me with the 1200R for Christmas one year–whether I wanted it or not—and it sat in the garage untouched for months. Finally, he planned a 100 mile ride to Joshua Tree and said, just ride it. To appease him, I did. About twenty-minutes down the highway, something clicked and I was hooked. We stopped at a gas station and I walked over to him and said, “Yep. I get it now.” No other motorcycle has the iconic, visceral feel that a Harley-Davidson does. That V-twin engine pulses through your body in a way that can’t be described, only experienced.

From the moment things began to click with my 1200, I knew it was the right bike for me. Everything about it felt right. It fit my body, fit my personality, fit my style of riding. Over the years, hubby has suggested I get something new, with less miles, but my Chromester and I have a bond of shared adventures that can never be equaled. Will I have other bikes? Sure. But I will have this Chromester forever.

Tell us what its life to ride the Chromester: Magic. Yep. That’s what it’s like. The throatiness. The solid feel. That magical vibration while idling and the way it smoothes out on the road. The power. Here’s the deal. Every touch-point on a Harley-Davidson feels like quality. They may be heavier, but that’s because they’re not made of plastic. The fenders are metal as are all the mounting hardware and the mirrors. While my ‘04 Bonneville is fun and zippy, it feels like a toy in comparison with my same year H-D.

Why the sportster? I didn’t choose the Sportster since it was a gift... but if I were shopping today, I’d still chose the Sportster because of the timeless design. In the sixty-plus years since the Sportster has been on the road, very little has changed stylistically. Quite simply, the design works. There is no mistaking a Sportster. They look tough and yet elegant in the clean lines and simplicity.

Tell us how you modified your bike to make it your own: A friend joked once about what I have against paint. My truck is paint free and so is my Chromester. The checkered flag emblem is from one of my favorite cars, a 1955 T-Bird, and below it, we added classic-styled tank-pads. We also added fork gators, a fat laced front wheel, solid back wheel, Race-Tech suspension, Lyndal Racing floating brake rotors, Magura hydraulic clutch, a rare H-D headlight nacelle, H-D performance rear suspension, Screaming Eagle hi-flow air cleaner, Dynojet Thunder Slide carb kit, Screaming Eagle slip on mufflers. Even after fifteen years on the road, this thing still runs like a champ.

Lori Bently Law - Harley-Davidson Babes Ride Out

Favorite trip to date: Three-weeks searching for the oldest Route 66 alignments with my best feller, riding from California to Chicago—both of us on Sportsters—and then up to Milwaukee. No windshield. No saddlebags. Just miles of pure joy and exploration.

Lori Bently Law - Harley-Davidson Babes Ride Out

You’ve been coming to Babes Ride Out for quite some time. Tell us about your personal experiences there: I’ve been to four Babes Ride Out events and I swear, it never gets old. BRO is truly the best weekend of the year. I’m not a rider with a pack. I tend to be a loner or ride with my feller. BRO gets me social. Every year I’ve ridden to BRO with someone different and each time had the most amazing experience. Every year I make new friends, get silly, laugh, go on adventures, bond, and reconnect. There’s no judging, no posturing, no cattiness. BRO has this incredible purity that can’t be matched. There’s no way to accurately describe what the weekend does for my soul. Last year was particularly meaningful since it fell just before I left a career of 24 years with NBC. Being with my pals was the perfect way to usher in my new life.

Any advice for ladies looking to take on two wheels? Put aside your fear, go to a class and learn the right way, and then get on your motorcycle and take a hundred mile trip. Seriously. No little jaunts about town. Put some miles under your tires in one day. Guarantee by day’s end, you will have connected with your machine and the road and you will fall in love.

Photo by Genevieve Davis

Photo by Genevieve Davis

Ready to roll? Click HERE for location where you can learn to ride

Want to get more info on the 1200? Click HERE

Cheryl Maples Explains Why Her 2018 Triumph Bobber Black Was the Perfect Combination of Speed, Response, and Beauty

People, Roll CallAshmore Ellis

Dealerships can be a tiny bit intimidating to a rider who is looking to purchase off the showroom floor as the choices can be overwhelming as every bike has their own appeal. Cheryl Maples found herself staring at 2018 Triumph Bobber Black, a bike she didn't even know was on the market, while accompanying her friend to look for her first bike at Motoprimo Motorsports in Lakeville Minnesota.  Sure, it was perfect visually, but was it perfect for the style of riding she liked to do? Cheryl went home to do her research and found herself back at the dealership 4 days later asking for the keys to her new Bobber. Read on to see what she found out about this beautiful machine and what won her over in the end. 

  • Name: Cheryl Maples

  • Location: St. Paul, MN

  • Instagram handle: @chmeryl

  • Occupation: Student & Crew at Trader Joes

How long have you been riding motorcycles? My first time on a motorcycle was in 2013. I had my permit but never went through with taking the riders course and getting my endorsement until May 2018.

Why do you ride motorcycles? For the feeling when you and your motorcycle move as one. The adrenaline rush, the stress relief, and going fast.  The feeling of being free, open, independent, and liberated.

Run us through the list of bikes you have had in your past: I learned on my husbands 80’s Kawasaki enduro, I had a 1983 Yamaha Virago for a very short period of time and then I got my 2018 Triumph Bobber Black.

What first attracted you to Triumph?  The styling of their bikes. I’ve always thought they looked the most attractive, plus they have a great reputation.

Babes Ride Out

How did you know it was the bike for you? It just felt right. My friend and I went to a dealership for her to find her first bike, I didn’t even know that this Bobber existed.  It caught my eye and I instantly fell in love with it. From the fat 16” front wheel to it’s matte blacked out muscular body, it was my dream bike. I left the dealership empty handed but couldn’t stop thinking about that bike.  I went home and did some research, learned a bit more about this motorcycle and bought it four days later.

Tell us what it is like to ride? This bike is a blast to ride! I like it because it looks old school and stylish, but it has a very modern sporty feel to it. It has a very responsive throttle because of the “ride-by-wire” technology. Once its spooled up it has plenty of power to get up and go. The bike is a little resistant to turning compared to some other bikes I’ve experienced, which is actually nice because it wants to stay up straight when riding, requiring less effort from the rider to keep it from drifting. Despite this, it does not have any difficulty cornering when you want it to. The bike is very maneuverable and can really lean into a turn. The suspension also does a great job at eliminating most of the feedback from the road. The brakes are very effective and do not lock up no matter how hard you squeeze them. All of the electronics are easy to manage, with the controls right at your fingertips. It has a digital fuel indicator, as well as features a fuel range indicator that makes it super easy to plan your next stop for gas. The modern tech and the old school style really make this bike an absolute blast to ride, whether its to the gas station for a soda, or down the road for a day-trip.

Babes Ride Out

What made you choose your model over the other Triumph Models?  The options that this bike has are amazing. It has twin front disc brakes, ABS, traction control, rain/road mode, and features that my car doesn’t even have. I just thought it had a lot to offer along with the way they styled this bike. Triumph did a phenomenal job when they built it.

What has been your favorite adventure you have taken on your new bike? Riding alongside the Mississippi River on the Great River Road in Wisconsin. Our area has a very winding and beautiful stretch that follows a few hundred miles around Lake Pepin. There are various intersections and bridges so you have the option of completing an all day lap around the lake, or taking a short trip by crossing a bridge early and coming back up the river on the Minnesota side. No matter how long you choose to ride these roads, its always a beautiful trip.

Do you have any fun road trips planned? I don’t currently have any planned right now but I have definitely started a list of places I want to go. I haven’t gotten the opportunity to experience a Babes Ride Out event but I follow their Instagram page and the women are a huge inspiration for me.  It makes me want to be more and do more. I look up to all of these amazing women riders.

Want to test ride the Bobber Black? Click HERE

Want to get the specs on Cheryl’s Triumph? Click HERE

Babes Ride Out
Babes Ride Out
Babes Ride Out

Babes in Borrego & The Original 50 | Meet Nina Kaplan

People, Roll CallAnya Violet

We connected with Nina over instagram before Babes in Borrego was even born. In fact, connecting with her was one of the reasons we thought maybe we should extend the invite to more women we were meeting on social media. From day #1 Nina has been an encouraging, inspiring, and truly awesome fixture in this community. Her passion for a life on two wheels is intoxicating and her positive state of mind and welcoming energy make you just want to be around her. Five years later we look back and are so thankful to have met Nina on that dry lake bed in the middle of nowhere at our first ever camp out. Read on to get to know Nina!

photo by Heidi Zumbrun

photo by Heidi Zumbrun

babes ride out

On October 5th 2013, 50 women rode out to an undisclosed location for a night of camping and camaraderie. What would follow could not have been predicted by anyone. The positivity, passion and enthusiasm for those 50 women has fueled the growth and exposure of a community that has meant so much to so many. We are highlighting each of those 50 women and sharing their stories over the past 5 years. 


Nina Kaplan


photo by Heidi Zumbrun

photo by Heidi Zumbrun

·       FULL NAME  NINA KAPLAN

·       INSTAGRAM HANDLE @niinhellhound

·       LOCATION Los Angeles

·       OCCUPATION Occupational Therapist

How did you find out about Babes in Borrego and what made you want to be a part of it?

As social media connected more and more women on motorcycles in 2013, I became aware of Anya and Ashmore, via a mutual photographer friend. We sent some messages back and forth, and I was invited to scout the site in Borrego with them for the first ever BABES RIDE OUT. Due to work commitments, I was unable to scout, however I was intent on going to the event. I had purchased my first motorcycle in 2011 and found some women to ride with in the SF bay area. I was keen to meet a group in LA as I had just relocated south.

When you arrived at the meet up, what was your first thoughts?

When I arrived at the meet up at the Starbucks in Temecula I think, I remember thinking, there’s a lot of us ladies on motos here! This is going to be a great weekend adventure.

Did you know anyone there? Is going on an adventure solo like this something you do or was this a first time out of your element kind of thing?

I did go to the event with two women rider friends I rode in the Bay area with, one of whom had recently moved to So Cal as well. Via social media, I was also connected to a crew of women from Portland were making the trek down for the event. One can feel out of their element in a new group scenario, but I tend to thrive and seek out those exact types of experiences. I love the opportunity to do and be involved in something new.

To go to something like this and the destination be unknown is kind of crazy.  What did you think of riding with all those ladies and of the destination?

Riding in a group is always tough, especially a group of unknown riders. I was fortunate to have some familiar friends with me, whom I stuck with for the ride. There were instances of passing, and going around riders who were inexperienced. We wove our way near the front, and I remember as we crested the hill and looked over into the Borrego Springs Valley, what an amazing view and feeling it was! The coordinates took us to a dirt road, which in reality was a mile or so of soft sand. The kind of sand that is like snow, it just so soft. It was wild to ride down that road together, going slow and helping others who had wiped out.

What was that one night like for you? Tell us about your experience.

I remember getting into the valley with the dry lake bed where camp would be. I had been speaking to a few other MOTO ladies from Portland and I was excited to connect with them and some friends that had ridden out from NY. As the sun set the ladies took to their bikes, and I remember them ripping around an oval on the dry lake bed in the golden hours of the day. I took a quiet moment by myself to take it all in. I thought here I am with the wild women, right where we belong. Off the grid, many of us not know to each other at that time, but sharing the common mentality of adventure and comradery, and even without knowing the other women well or at all, there was a sense that we were there to support each other. It was a powerful feeling to be immediately connected to so many like minded women.

Tell us about the ladies you met and have your friendships have evolved over the past 5 years.  Do you keep in touch?

I met so ladies on this trip, many whom I developed deep and lasting friendships with. Friendships that have taken me across the country in the US and on adventure moto trips in Guatemala. The connections made in year one are some of most cherished. I return to the even every year to continue to make new connections.

How have you changed over the past 5 years?

So much has changed for me in the years since the first event, as life is ever-changing. Something I am most excited about developing in the years since the first event is my involvement in the BRO DIRT event. I have attended for 3 years and finally was able to bring a dirt bike of my own to the last event. I am excited to make the same connections and deepen friendships with the ladies that ride dirt.

Have you gone on any more camping / riding trips since that 2013 ride? If so, where and with who?

In 2015 I was lucky to go across country with Harley Davidson and Lana McNaughton of the Women’s Moto Exhibit. Other riders included Jenny Czinder of (strange Vacation) whom I met at year one BRO, and Imogen Lethonen (who I attended year 2 with), and Megan who I met at year 2 as well I think.

In December of 2016 I did a 12 day self-guided moto trip in Guatemala with Leslie Padoll of BH.and.BR and Kate Unver whom I met at BRO east coast.

I was also lucky enough to attend year one of BRO east coast, as so many ladies from the east coast come out to the west coast event, I wanted to do the opposite. I rode with Kate and Leslie on this trip and it was a great experience, I love the first year of an event, it always seems to hold the most magic.

What is it like coming back to Babes Ride Out as it has grown?  

Initially the growth of the event felt foreign and a departure from the first year. However, as I have attended throughout the years, I have reveled in how many women the event attracts, and seen it as an opportunity to connect to a wider and wider group of moto women! Now the event is such an amazing production it feels like a moto festival and I love it!

What are your thoughts on the Moto community and industry as a whole?

I love being part of the women’s moto community, I feel that as the minority within the industry as a whole we hold a very valuable position and the ability to connect and bond with each other at events such as BRO is very important.