Babes Ride Out

DIY Tips

5 Simple Steps to Being More Eco-Friendly When on the Road

DIY TipsAshmore Ellis

As motorcyclist we tend to pull over multiple times for re-fuels, stretch our legs, bathroom breaks, snap some pics, and most importantly snack. Packing your own provisions instead of relying on a sketchy gas station is something that most of us already do but ECOSLO has some additional suggestions on lighter, reusable, and sustainable items you can add to your gear bag to reduce your carbon footprint Read on….

Bamboo utensils, TP and a camp mug = MUST

Bamboo utensils, TP and a camp mug = MUST


5 Eco-Friendly Switches for Motorcyclists

Reusable and biodegradable are your (and the Earth’s) best friend! There are plenty of alternatives to those single-use plastics and items that need to be trashed to help get you to your destination. Be sure to stop by the ECOSLO booth at the Santa Margarita BRO event to learn more about ways to lessen your carbon footprint as you traverse this beautiful place we call home.

Introducing On-Site Camping Gear Rental Partner Arrive Outdoors

DIY Tips, Events, Safety, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

For many riders, camping off the bike is still very new (and that’s ok!). It took me years to dial in my camping kit and learn how to safely pack it on the back of my motorcycle efficiently. For those novice moto campers, or those who have old outdated gear, or don’t want to bother with packing all their crap, we decided to partner with a quality outdoor rental company, Arrive, that rents all sorts of camping gear and will be on site to distribute it to you when you…well… arrive. Make sure to reserve your gear early cause they will sell out of many of the tents, sleeping bags, pads, camp chairs….you get the picture.

How do I reserve my gear to be on site to pick up when I arrive?

When you order gear from Arrive, use code “BRO” at checkout and choose warehouse pickup. You’ll see the Arrive booth upon entering the gates for the event. All you need to do is bring your ID to their tent , after you are parked in your zone, and pick up your items! Please note that you are responsible for setting up, breaking down, and of course returning rental gear to their booth by 10:00AM Sunday morning.

Click HERE to get started as all items must be pre-booked through their website prior to the event.

Now you can travel to the Central Coast without all your camping gear strapped to the back of your motorcycle (which can be pretty dangerous if you’ve never packed your gear before and tested it out. You’d be amazed how quickly items shake out and into your power band which causes an immediate HALT ( not fun)).

About Arrive

A little about our partner - Arrive is an outdoor experience company that is transforming the outdoor industry into an easier and more sustainable model. The main goal of Arrive is to help people experience the outdoors without the burden of buying, cleaning and storing gear. Arrive partners directly with over 40 premium outdoor gear brands to offer their gear for rent, everything from tents and sleeping bags to stoves, headlamps, and blankets! If you have any questions about what you’ll need at Babes Ride Out, just give them a call at 213 534-8852.



The Ultimate Packing List for Babes Ride Out East Coast

DIY Tips, Events, SafetyAshmore Ellis

Packing for a weekend away on your motorcycle can be a little intimidating if it's your first time especially when rolling to the Catskills which is notorious for having unexpected weather. Will you screw up and forget something important? Probably but hey, that's the fun of it and we've never heard of anyone self destructing if they've forgotten their toothpaste. If you have not taken a few minutes to familiarize yourself with where the event is, do so now. View where the closest gas station, grocery store, restaurants, hardware stores, and where the closest mechanic is located whom has business hours over the weekend. As you can see, town is walking distance and has some incredible restaurants and a grocery store for anyone who has special needs or wants to enjoy the quaint township. Click below to educate yourself on these things. 

69 De Mauro Lane, Narrowsburg NY

Babes Ride Out

 

Ok! Now that you have read the yelp reviews of The Heron (spicy grits are N U T S). Lets discuss how to SAFELY pack your bike. For this, we ask one of our favorite road dogs, Bill Bryant of Biltwell his tips and tricks. Take note, share with friends, this is a good one.

How to Safely Pack Your Motorcycle by Bill Bryant of Biltwell

The primary goal when packing for a multi day riding trip is to not be killed by all the bullshit you strap to your motorcycle. I’ve dodged more than my share of tools, water bottles and other dangerous debris riding behind friends over the years and lost a few bits of my own along the way. Here’s a couple tips that might make things safer and more convenient for you and the people following behind you.

In the military, people who can’t keep their shit together get nicknamed “Yard Sale” or “Soup Sandwich”. To avoid ending up with one of these embarrassing monikers, one has to learn to bring only what’s needed and not be in a hurry to pack it.

1. Safety

If your gear feels loose, it is. You should be able to grab anything strapped to your bike and give it a decent tug. If it easily moves around, that’s what it’s going to do once you hit the road. Use high quality straps, and avoid bungees for anything major or heavy. There’s nothing wrong with deploying more straps than you need. They may come in handy later anyway. Think of the amount of air pushing on all that gear as you blast down the highway for hours at a time. Make sure all zippers and closures are tight, and face them away from the wind if possible. Recheck your load at every stop. Tighten down straps, look for loose ends dangling near the tire, etc. Your wheels and chain are hungry. More than one chopper hero has gone down when their shit got caught in the back sprocket. I’ve seen a single pair of surf trunks bring a bike to an immediate halt in the middle of a Mexican highway (Marco, you out there?) Likewise, a sloppy jacket hastily bungeed on a sissy bar jammed up in the rear wheel so hard once that we had to remove the wheel to get it out (remember that one, Eddie?). Make sure any loose ends on straps are tied up tight and can not rub against any of the spinning bits. Use the buddy system and always keep an eye on your riding partner’s gear, and make sure they are watching yours. If you see something getting loose or close to the wheel, lopsided, etc, wave ‘em over so they can fix it. That small hassle is way better than a big one if the offending gear gets wrapped around your chain at 80mph. Distribute the load as low and evenly as possible. Keep the heavy stuff like tools down low as possible to avoid changing the dynamic of the bike. Heavy stuff up high always tries to work it’s downward or off to one side, so pack it low and symmetrical. If you put all the weight on one side, it’ll all be hanging off in an hour. Put some stuff up on the bars/risers where you can see it, but not too much or it’ll affect the way the bike handles. Don’t put so much up there that you have a hard time seeing over/around it. That may sound dumb, but I’ve done it myself, so I know it’s possible. Doh! Reduce your kit. One of the best pre­flight measures you can take is to spread out all your gear on the floor or workbench before loading it. Then put about half of it back where you got it. The less you bring, the better your chances of keeping it all together. Share the load with your buddies if you are riding with friends. Chances are a group of four riders doesn’t need four individual stoves, so divvy up stuff like that instead of bringing more than the group needs.

2. Levels of Storage

Being able to access what you need with the least amount of hassle on the road is a skill that takes a little forethought. Dividing it all up into levels of storage reduces the chance of losing something or digging to the bottom of an otherwise nicely packed bag. Here’s the way I do it:

A) Immediate : This is the stuff I can grab without opening anything. It’s what I keep clipped on the outside of my bag or on my person: wallet, registration paperwork, multi­tool, pocket knife, sunscreen, phone, flash light, sun glasses and clears, shop rag or bandana, smokes, lighter. I usually wear a vest on a trip, not so much for fashion (I’m helpless in that department anyway) but so I can have all this crap on me and not sitting on any of it. No one wants to wait on you to get your credit card out of the bottom of a giant duffel at every gas stop and every time you dig into that gear there is a chance you’ll hurry through it and leave something undone.

B) Ready: You need to get at stuff like tools, oil, spare gas, and a water bottle with very little effort. So this stuff goes in outside pockets or top layers of your bag. I usually include a towel, trunks and flip flops in this category when weather looks nice. If there’s half a chance of rain or drastic weather changes, I’ll have rain gear and extra layers ready to go and easy to get to in a hurry. Likewise, if you start out early in the morning and need to shed layers in a couple hours, think ahead about where that stuff is going to go. I like to roll up a flannel or jacket and clip it to the front of my Exfil­7 bag on the handlebars so I can open two buckles and unroll what I need.

C) Buried: You really only need your tent, sleeping bag, food, cooking kit or change of clothes at the end of the day. This stuff can be buried a little deeper and harder to get to since you shouldn’t need it in an emergency or on the side of the road.

3. Adapt your Bike for Carrying Stuff

Build or buy a strong sissy bar and strap an appropriate amount of stuff to it. I’ve witnessed dudes putting a heavy gas can on a sissy built out of 1/2 rod and end up wearing it all a few hundred miles later when the thing gives out. Buy some decent throw over saddlebags and make sure they have mounts that keep ‘em out of the rear wheel. If you have a stock­ish bike, there are usually lots of aftermarket racks available. You need to carry at least basic tools so buy a decent tool bag that won’t give out from the weight. Don’t strap to things that get hot or have sharp edges. The best way to sort your kit is to go on the longest multi-
day trip you can afford and camp along the way. By the morning of about day four you will be donating junk you didn’t really need and you will have figured out what things belong in each level of storage. Don’t be afraid to watch some weathered road dog pack their kit in the morning, you might learn a trick or two. Remember, the tighter your gear is, the more time you have to enjoy the trip. Being thoughtful about how you pack not only keeps you safe, it keeps you from earning the “Yard Sale” nickname. 

Luggage we LOVE by Biltwell! These bags strap so easily onto your motorcycle and give you the option to access anything you pack easily.



What to Pack Specifically for Babes Ride Out East Coast 4 

  • Have your bike serviced BEFORE you come to the event. Make sure that baby is tuned up and roadworthy! 

  • Add the $35 100 mile moto towing to your AAA package. It's good for a year and YES, I have had to use mine before and it's saved me a ton of cash. If you bike breaks down, this is like having a guardian angel. 

  • Russbrown BAM card. This is basically like having an angel in your back pocket for roadside assistance and we’ve used it before! It’s free to sign up for and can save you hundreds of dollars. Click HERE for your FREE membership.

  • Tent/Hammock (tons of trees at this site for shade) Make sure ALL pieces are there before you roll out to the event. Nothing is worst than a missing rain fly or pole. 

  • Sleeping Pad

  • Sleeping Bag

  • Headlamp

  • Water Bottle w/ clip (we have potable water on site to fill your bottles)

  • Wet Wipes / Face wipes 

  • Pillow (camp size)

  • Camp towel (the quick drying kind that folds up super small) 

  • Extra fuel (check out Lowbrow Customs fuel canister at $19.95)

  • Warm clothes (HOT TIP! Waterproof compression sacks can fit everything you need and more)

  • Clothes for extreme heat & humidity

  • Zip ties

  • A couple of sandwich bags in case it rains and you need to create a waterproof way of carrying your iphone.

  • Trash bag to cover your seat at night

  • Rain poncho (the kind that fits in your pocket)

  • Multi tool

  • Toiletries 

  • Sunscreen

  • Tool kit / roll

  • Swimsuit

  • Flip flops (super shitty ones for the shower)

  • Bug spray... seriously, you'll want this!

  • $$ always have cash on you no matter what. A lot of times banks will cut off your card as you nickel and dime your visa at the gas pump or a state park will require a small fee. 

  • $$ for merch

  • $$ for food truck

  • $$ for coffee

  • Camera or GoPro

  • Positive mental attitude

  • Rain gear (if weather calls for it or not)

Forget something? There is a camp store on site that has everything you need. They take cash and cards :) 

Remember, weather  changes daily and is unpredictable so always be prepared. If you need to get anything, we highly recommend going to backcountry.com or REI  they have it all and you still have time to order these supplies online before the event. Happy camping! - Ashmore 

Mojave Desert Land Trust x Biltwell x Babes Ride Out Pin | A Commitment to Leave No Trace

DIY Tips, Locals, Artist Series, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

Our planet is precious. No matter where we go, we want to be conscious of the impact we have on the incredible natural landscapes we have the privilege of experiencing from the rider’s seat. One of our goals at Babes Ride Out 6 is to be more respectful of the ecosystems we enjoy. After all, we want future Babes to be able to ride around these desert lands for generations to come.

We have partnered with the Mojave Desert Land Trust to help reduce our footprint on the desert and everywhere we roam on two wheels or four. That is why we are excited to launch the official Mojave Desert Land Trust x Biltwell x Babes Ride Out pin. $5 from every pin sold will be donated to the Mojave Desert Land Trust to help them keep securing and protecting this beautiful place we call home. 

Babes Ride Out

Stop by the Mojave Land Trust Booth when you arrive at Babes Ride Out 6 to purchase this limited edition lapel pin and know you are truly making a difference.

How to Reduce Your Carbon Footprint and Visit the Park and Monuments Respectfully

One of the greatest joys of exploring on two wheels is capturing special moments to share with your family and friends. We want your loyal Instagram followers to see your stunning snapshots of that earth-splitting desert sunset or that adorable desert tortoise, but we also want these special landscapes and habitats to stay the way they were before we rode into town.

There are a few things to keep in mind when striking out to take pictures in fragile ecosystems. Our friends at the Mojave Desert Land Trust are experts on how artists (yes, Instagram artists count, too!) can consciously engage with the desert. Their Reading the Landscape program, guides artists through the process of creating in a way that ensures the desert will provide inspiration for generations to come.

 Going off road can create irreversible damage to the ecosystem. Here are MDLT’s tips for reducing your impact on the desert while still getting that perfect shot:

·         Stay on designated roads and trails. Avoid loose sand and soil – especially if you’re setting up a tripod! Designated areas are always a safe bet.

·         Take what you brought, including debris, chemicals, equipment, and liquids. Pack it in, pack it out!

·         Leave what you find, including rocks, vegetation, animals, bones, and historical trash.

·         Know who owns the land prior to your site visit, as well as how to access the land through legal routes and using an appropriate vehicle.

·         Identify and avoid on-site cultural resources, historic debris, and wildlife burrows. For example: A desert tortoise burrow entrance looks like the letter “D” lying on its side.

·         Respect the wildlife by giving them space. For close-up shots, make sure you have your zoom lens on hand.

·         Review the rules and regulations of the land management agency specific to your project. Obtain a commercial permit, when appropriate. If you intend to create art within Joshua Tree National Park’s boundaries, determine if your project requires a Special Use Permit. Commercial filming or photography requires a filming permit, but permits are not required for news crews or visitors photographing for personal use. All permit applications can be emailed to JOTR_Special_Use@NPS.Gov

·         Use Instagram as an educational platform for other photographers! If you see a photo on Instagram that is less-than-respectful of our desert ecosystem, politely let the user know. Our citizen Desert Defenders in Joshua Tree have used Instagram as a tool to educate visitors to great effect.

With these tips, you will be able to reduce your impact on the desert – and share its beauty with all your family, friends, and followers!

When you follow these simple rules, you are protecting all these beautiful creatures and their home :)