Babes Ride Out

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Malary Lee Proves Skill Conquers All on Her Harley-Davidson Dyna ...and her Flat Track Bike... and her Dirt Bike

Roll Call, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

When I first met Malary Lee I was immediately impressed by the way she handled a bike cause … well, she is a bit smaller. It was clear that true skill conquers all and Malary Lee had it. With 5 bikes in her garage that focus on street, flat track, and dirt, she is not planning on slowing down, in fact she is dominating races like Flat Out Friday and Dirt Quake with her Harley-Davidson. Get to know the Austin Texas local Malary Lee, and make sure to cheer her on when you see her at a race near you. She will be the one with purple hair shredding shredding it.

Photo by Malary Lee

Photo by Malary Lee

How long have you been riding motorcycles and how did you get started? 

I've been riding motorcycles for 8 years. Riding was always something I knew I wanted to do. When I finally had enough money saved up I bought a little bike.

Why do you ride motorcycles / What do you get out of riding motorcycles? 

I ride motorcycles to challenge myself outside of my comfort zone and to say yes to things that scare me. When I started riding, leaving the neighborhood scared me. Now I've ridden across the country. Then I got a dirt bike & leaving the ground was something that felt foreign. Now I push myself to see how far I can fly. I sign up for races that I know I'm not fast enough for, because in life you're never really ready for anything.. you just have to be willing to say yes. Motorcycles motivate me to push myself physically & mentally.

Run us through the list of bikes you have had in your past / currently own: 

My first bike was a cm185 - then a kz400 that I ended up trading for a km100. My dream bike was a cb350 so I bought a red one, that I eventually sold to a dad to give to his daughter for her 16th birthday. I bought a green cb350 that I moved across the country from Iowa to Texas with. The roads in Texas were faster so I purchased an 883 sportster that I upgraded to a 1200. Then I got into dirt biking, starting with a xr100, then a crf150r and finally a Ktm 250 sx-f. I sold the sportster and bought a 2000 fxdx. I currently own 5 bikes: the dyna (fxdx), my KTM, klx110, the green cb350 & another sportster 1200 I've converted into a flat track bike.

Photo by Genevieve Davis

Photo by Genevieve Davis

What first attracted you to Harley-Davidson? 

When I moved to Texas I had a cb350, but I knew I needed something bigger and faster if I wanted to ride across the country. I chose the Harley Sportster, because as someone who is 5'0 it was easy to modify for me to touch the ground & maneuver. Now that I'm more comfortable on bikes, I don't mind not being able to touch the ground. The dyna is a perfect upgrade and handles so well. My current sportster was easy to customize into a race bike. I have loved every Harley I've ever owned for different reasons.

How did you know it was the bike for you? 

I knew it was the bike for me the first time I rode it. I had the biggest smile on my face and nothing else mattered after that. I was set on leaving that day with my Harley.

Tell us what it is like to ride your particular bike: 

I can't really explain it.. I've ridden a lot of bikes and have enjoyed them all for what they are. But riding my bike, that's set up for me - that I have made my own feels like it's apart of me. When I ride my bike you can't wipe the grin off my face.

What made you choose your model over the other H-D models? 

I did some research on bike models and years - what would be easiest to find parts for and settled on something that in time would be easiest to fix if I needed, but would hold it's value.

Photo by Jenny Lindquist

Photo by Jenny Lindquist

Any modifications? Tell us about them if so:

oh man... so many. The 96 1200 sportster has been completely gone over to become a race bike. Husqvarna front end, chain conversion, new bars, seat, suspension, converted the back wheel to a 19" etc. The dyna is just normal stuff people do: custom paint, seat, bars... it's pretty :)

What has been you favorite adventure you have taken on your bike? 

My favorite adventure was my first road trip from Austin, Texas to Moab, Utah. It was in May where it's summer in Texas already, but still winter in the rest of the country. I got caught in a snow storm in the Rocky Mountains after a gas station attendant gave some incorrect directions in an out of service area. I was rescued by a ranger and escorted to a ski resort in Taos where a Winter Movie Festival was happening. The whole trip was something that in the moment I was wondering what I'd gotten myself into, but afterwards could laugh because it's all part of the adventure & now I have a really funny story.

Photo by Katie O’Connel

Photo by Katie O’Connel

Do you have any fun road trips planned? 

Currently, I'm recovering from a dirt bike crash so nothing official until I'm healed. However, I've always got ideas for adventures brewing.

Tell us about your experience at Babes Ride Out?

I attended the second year of babes ride out and a couple events since. Every one is a completely different experience & it's exactly what you make it. For me, it's about friendship & adventure. I've met so many of my best friends from going to BRO events. I would highly recommend every lady to check out at least one event.

Any advice for ladies who want to get started on two wheels?

Stop thinking about it and do it. Sign up for a course. Ask a friend who rides for help. Make the steps. You won't regret it!

Photo by Mikey Revolt

Photo by Mikey Revolt

Want to learn more about Harley-Davidson motos? Click HERE

Want to take one on a test ride? Click HERE

Say Hello to the Real Deal Revolution | Join them for their hand on demos at BRO East Coast 4

Sponsors, EventsAnya Violet

"Calling ALL BABES! It’s time to heat things up a bit at BRO East Coast. The Renegades of the Real Deal Revolution are coming in hot! This year at BRO East Coast in glorious Narrowsburg, New York, things are gonna get REAL!

Photo by Obsidian Photo

Photo by Obsidian Photo

Born of the desire to empower babes to get tools in their hands, the non-profit 501c3 Real Deal Revolution, is here to “Revolutionize the perception of skilled trades. . . . and women’s roles in them.” These Renegades are made up of a team of women that fabricate, forge, wrench, ride, wheel, and weld. And they’re looking for recruits.

They’re bringing their skills, talent and tools to BRO East and will be setting up shop to offer basic training custom paint, welding, moto talk and more. Their ‘pop-up’ shops at past BRO events have been in huge demand with lines out the doors. Clearly you don’t want to miss the Renegades in action. And remember, no previous experience required. Just a desire to work and learn.

RDR’s main goal is to get babes on a level where they feel comfortable maintaining and upgrading their own bikes. Through experience they’ve discovered that exposing these babes lifts the veil of intimidation, inspires confidence and pride in their accomplishments. They teach babes that it’s ok to get their hands dirty and that knowing how to use tools is sexy! Taking it one step further they want to encourage all babes to take a chance, enter the Real Deal Bike Show at BRO and share their stories of victory, share their style, share their progress.  

Photo by Obsidian Photo

Photo by Obsidian Photo

Founder Jessi Combs says it best, “We simply want to encourage and support women, because we truly believe that self empowerment comes from the ability to handle anything on your own, in any situation, no matter where you are. Our team lives and breathes that freedom daily and enjoys sharing how fulfilling that awesomeness really is. The vibe at BRO over the last few years gave a massive impression of what is really happening; it’s way more than just a ladies moto campout, it’s a revolution. We found ourselves compelled to be a part something so tangible and so on the forefront of morphing the way us women roll.

Check out the Renegades website at www.realdealrevolution.org for Real Deal Revolution merchandise, instructional workshoppe schedules, blog posts on Real Deal women, and to follow their journeys of inspiring more women to work creatively in the shop and play hard in life.

We look forward to sharing their skills with you again! Make sure to stop by their booth onsite, sign up for a workshoppe, pick up some tools, and add a new skill or two to your repertoire of awesomeness. Donations will also help fund future workshoppes and grow this revolution."

babes ride out



 

Mojave Desert Land Trust x Biltwell x Babes Ride Out Pin | A Commitment to Leave No Trace

DIY Tips, Locals, Artist Series, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

Our planet is precious. No matter where we go, we want to be conscious of the impact we have on the incredible natural landscapes we have the privilege of experiencing from the rider’s seat. One of our goals at Babes Ride Out 6 is to be more respectful of the ecosystems we enjoy. After all, we want future Babes to be able to ride around these desert lands for generations to come.

We have partnered with the Mojave Desert Land Trust to help reduce our footprint on the desert and everywhere we roam on two wheels or four. That is why we are excited to launch the official Mojave Desert Land Trust x Biltwell x Babes Ride Out pin. $5 from every pin sold will be donated to the Mojave Desert Land Trust to help them keep securing and protecting this beautiful place we call home. 

Babes Ride Out

Stop by the Mojave Land Trust Booth when you arrive at Babes Ride Out 6 to purchase this limited edition lapel pin and know you are truly making a difference.

How to Reduce Your Carbon Footprint and Visit the Park and Monuments Respectfully

One of the greatest joys of exploring on two wheels is capturing special moments to share with your family and friends. We want your loyal Instagram followers to see your stunning snapshots of that earth-splitting desert sunset or that adorable desert tortoise, but we also want these special landscapes and habitats to stay the way they were before we rode into town.

There are a few things to keep in mind when striking out to take pictures in fragile ecosystems. Our friends at the Mojave Desert Land Trust are experts on how artists (yes, Instagram artists count, too!) can consciously engage with the desert. Their Reading the Landscape program, guides artists through the process of creating in a way that ensures the desert will provide inspiration for generations to come.

 Going off road can create irreversible damage to the ecosystem. Here are MDLT’s tips for reducing your impact on the desert while still getting that perfect shot:

·         Stay on designated roads and trails. Avoid loose sand and soil – especially if you’re setting up a tripod! Designated areas are always a safe bet.

·         Take what you brought, including debris, chemicals, equipment, and liquids. Pack it in, pack it out!

·         Leave what you find, including rocks, vegetation, animals, bones, and historical trash.

·         Know who owns the land prior to your site visit, as well as how to access the land through legal routes and using an appropriate vehicle.

·         Identify and avoid on-site cultural resources, historic debris, and wildlife burrows. For example: A desert tortoise burrow entrance looks like the letter “D” lying on its side.

·         Respect the wildlife by giving them space. For close-up shots, make sure you have your zoom lens on hand.

·         Review the rules and regulations of the land management agency specific to your project. Obtain a commercial permit, when appropriate. If you intend to create art within Joshua Tree National Park’s boundaries, determine if your project requires a Special Use Permit. Commercial filming or photography requires a filming permit, but permits are not required for news crews or visitors photographing for personal use. All permit applications can be emailed to JOTR_Special_Use@NPS.Gov

·         Use Instagram as an educational platform for other photographers! If you see a photo on Instagram that is less-than-respectful of our desert ecosystem, politely let the user know. Our citizen Desert Defenders in Joshua Tree have used Instagram as a tool to educate visitors to great effect.

With these tips, you will be able to reduce your impact on the desert – and share its beauty with all your family, friends, and followers!

When you follow these simple rules, you are protecting all these beautiful creatures and their home :) 

ATWYLD at Babes Ride Out 6

SponsorsAnya Violet

ATWYLD was built for the modern woman who rides. Female riders have often been overlooked when it comes to protective riding apparel. Well, we are excited to say that Atwyld will be on site at Babes Ride Out 6 and you will be the first to see their newest collection! Come by their tent to get fitted, capture a memory on their photobooth, create a custom pin to take home or relax with a complimentary sample of Range Essential after your long ride on Thursday! See you there!

babes ride out
babes ride out
Babes ride out
Photo by Genevieve Davis

Photo by Genevieve Davis

Photo by Heidi Zumbrun

Photo by Heidi Zumbrun

Tips for Riders Traveling Alone by Staci Wilt via Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys

DIY Tips, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

Our dear friend Staci has ridden solo for thousands of miles and has learned a ton of tips and tricks along the way. As we near Babes Ride Out 6, we wanted to share her blog post on Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys that is chocked full of tips for solo travelers but these helpful suggestions also apply to anyone hopping on two wheels in search of adventure. Read on and get all her tips and tricks by clicking HERE.

Staci WIlt. Babes Ride Out.jpg

Before You Ride, Join B.A.M for Free | Road Side Assistance

The sole purpose of the BAM program is to keep motorcyclists across the country safe and protected on the road! Whether you experience a breakdown, a flat tire, run out of gas or even a motorcycle accident. BAM is an excellent resource for FREE roadside assistance and legal advice. Motorcyclists are oftentimes the underdogs of the roads and highways they ride—but with a BAM card in your wallet you never ride alone. As a member of Russ Brown’s BAM program, you have the backing of over two million motorcyclists like yourself plus the top legal minds of the country ready to advise you should you get into a motorcycle accident.

Our BAM family offers a unique safety net in the event of a roadside emergency and has done so for over 30 years. BAM Founder, Russ Brown started this program so that no rider should ever feel alone or stranded without help. Millions of riders since have rallied to make BAM the strongest volunteer program of its kind in the world.





Close Encounters of the Adorable Kind | Mojave Desert Land Trust's List of Critters You May See During Babes Ride Out 6

Locals, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

On long rides, sometimes it’s nice to stop and smell the roses…or spot the tortoise! During your time at Babes Ride Out 6, we hope you’ll keep an eye out for the awesome desert plants and animals that make this location so special. Here are some notable flora and fauna that is active during the month of October in Joshua Tree and beyond. Just remember to give critters their space, don’t feed them, and watch out for animals crossing the road!

Mojave Yucca An iconic desert plant and close relative of the Joshua tree, these spiky shrubs can be seen all around Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, and in the southern portion of Mojave Trails.

mojave yucca Babes Ride Out.jpg

Desert Holly It may only be October, but much like your local department store, the Mojave Desert is already getting in the Christmas spirit! You can spot these prickly clusters with red berries at Amboy Crater.

DesertHolly Babes Ride Out.jpg

California Juniper These bushy trees can be found on desert slopes in Joshua Tree National Park. Keep your eyes – and nose! – open for beautiful blue berries and that refreshing juniper fragrance.

Juniper Babes Ride Out.jpg

Pinyon Pine Harvested for timber and firewood over the centuries, the sweet pinyon wood fragrance invokes the image of pueblos and adobe homes. You can find these majestic, twisting trees throughout the desert on rocky, southern-facing slopes and mesas.

pinyon-pine-babes ride out.jpg

Honey Mesquite Known for its beautiful beans that sustained travelers in the frontier days, the mesquite is the most common shrub of the desert southwest. You can find honey mesquites and their pods in Big Morongo Canyon Preserve

Mesquite Babes Ride Out.jpg

Red-Tailed Hawk True to its name, the red-tailed hawk has a broad, rounded tail with a rich, russet hue. You can see these amazing aerial acrobats circling around in the sky throughout the desert, especially in north Mojave Trails.

Red-tailed-Hawk- Babes Ride Out Joshua Tree.jpg

Bighorn Sheep Mature male bighorn sheep have curled horns that can reach up to 33 inches, while juvenile and female horns never exceed a half-curl. These majestic creatures can be seen scrambling up mountain slopes during the day, especially in the morning when they feed, at the Whitewater Preserve.

Big Horn Babes Ride Out Joshua Tree.jpg

Desert Tortoise With their domed shells and ambling gait, the California state reptile is one of the most recognizable species in the Mojave. October an active time of the year for the desert tortoise, so maybe you’ll get lucky and spot one among the shrubs. If you see a desert tortoise on the road, follow Joshua Tree National Park’s guide on when and how to move a desert tortoise.

Babes Ride Out Joshua Tree

Chuckwalla These plump, peaceful lizards are usually the size of your forearm and emerge in the morning to bask in the sun before hunting for food. Look for these regal reptiles at Amboy Crater amongst the lava rock.

Chuckwalla Babes Ride Out.jpg

Sphinx Moth The sphinx moths are among the largest flying insects in the desert and have fabulously flashy pink hind wings. You may confuse these beautiful bugs for hummingbirds when they are flapping around in the early evening throughout the desert lands.

Moth Babes Ride Out.jpg