Babes Ride Out

BRO East Coast 4 Maker | Sara Mulvey of Revelry Tintype

Artist Series, EventsAnya Violet

Babes Ride Out will be hosting our Makers Market at BRO East Coast 4 this year. The BRO Makers Market is a curated group of female makers that will be on site showcasing their talents and  providing a unique experience for attendees. Meet Sara Mulvey of Revelry Tintype.

babes ride out
Sara Mulvey

Sara Mulvey

Sara Mulvey is a large format and ultra large format photographer, focusing in wet plate collodion photography. Not traditionally trained, she became interested in wet plate photography after inheriting family tintypes - they seemed to transcended time and space. She has carved her own path in wet plate ever since. The meticulous and meditative process of wet plate creates images that are in essence a transmutation of silver and light - that moment between the subject and photographer locked in time. That intimacy and connection is what Sara hopes to continue to capture through her personal works and portraiture. Her vision with Revelry Tintype is not only to share the historic process of wet plate photography with those around her but to create stunning images that will hopefully spark the magic in others that first drew her to this art form. Sara lives and works in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina.

Malary Lee Proves Skill Conquers All on Her Harley-Davidson Dyna ...and her Flat Track Bike... and her Dirt Bike

Roll Call, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

When I first met Malary Lee I was immediately impressed by the way she handled a bike cause … well, she is a bit smaller. It was clear that true skill conquers all and Malary Lee had it. With 5 bikes in her garage that focus on street, flat track, and dirt, she is not planning on slowing down, in fact she is dominating races like Flat Out Friday and Dirt Quake with her Harley-Davidson. Get to know the Austin Texas local Malary Lee, and make sure to cheer her on when you see her at a race near you. She will be the one with purple hair shredding shredding it.

Photo by Malary Lee

Photo by Malary Lee

How long have you been riding motorcycles and how did you get started? 

I've been riding motorcycles for 8 years. Riding was always something I knew I wanted to do. When I finally had enough money saved up I bought a little bike.

Why do you ride motorcycles / What do you get out of riding motorcycles? 

I ride motorcycles to challenge myself outside of my comfort zone and to say yes to things that scare me. When I started riding, leaving the neighborhood scared me. Now I've ridden across the country. Then I got a dirt bike & leaving the ground was something that felt foreign. Now I push myself to see how far I can fly. I sign up for races that I know I'm not fast enough for, because in life you're never really ready for anything.. you just have to be willing to say yes. Motorcycles motivate me to push myself physically & mentally.

Run us through the list of bikes you have had in your past / currently own: 

My first bike was a cm185 - then a kz400 that I ended up trading for a km100. My dream bike was a cb350 so I bought a red one, that I eventually sold to a dad to give to his daughter for her 16th birthday. I bought a green cb350 that I moved across the country from Iowa to Texas with. The roads in Texas were faster so I purchased an 883 sportster that I upgraded to a 1200. Then I got into dirt biking, starting with a xr100, then a crf150r and finally a Ktm 250 sx-f. I sold the sportster and bought a 2000 fxdx. I currently own 5 bikes: the dyna (fxdx), my KTM, klx110, the green cb350 & another sportster 1200 I've converted into a flat track bike.

Photo by Genevieve Davis

Photo by Genevieve Davis

What first attracted you to Harley-Davidson? 

When I moved to Texas I had a cb350, but I knew I needed something bigger and faster if I wanted to ride across the country. I chose the Harley Sportster, because as someone who is 5'0 it was easy to modify for me to touch the ground & maneuver. Now that I'm more comfortable on bikes, I don't mind not being able to touch the ground. The dyna is a perfect upgrade and handles so well. My current sportster was easy to customize into a race bike. I have loved every Harley I've ever owned for different reasons.

How did you know it was the bike for you? 

I knew it was the bike for me the first time I rode it. I had the biggest smile on my face and nothing else mattered after that. I was set on leaving that day with my Harley.

Tell us what it is like to ride your particular bike: 

I can't really explain it.. I've ridden a lot of bikes and have enjoyed them all for what they are. But riding my bike, that's set up for me - that I have made my own feels like it's apart of me. When I ride my bike you can't wipe the grin off my face.

What made you choose your model over the other H-D models? 

I did some research on bike models and years - what would be easiest to find parts for and settled on something that in time would be easiest to fix if I needed, but would hold it's value.

Photo by Jenny Lindquist

Photo by Jenny Lindquist

Any modifications? Tell us about them if so:

oh man... so many. The 96 1200 sportster has been completely gone over to become a race bike. Husqvarna front end, chain conversion, new bars, seat, suspension, converted the back wheel to a 19" etc. The dyna is just normal stuff people do: custom paint, seat, bars... it's pretty :)

What has been you favorite adventure you have taken on your bike? 

My favorite adventure was my first road trip from Austin, Texas to Moab, Utah. It was in May where it's summer in Texas already, but still winter in the rest of the country. I got caught in a snow storm in the Rocky Mountains after a gas station attendant gave some incorrect directions in an out of service area. I was rescued by a ranger and escorted to a ski resort in Taos where a Winter Movie Festival was happening. The whole trip was something that in the moment I was wondering what I'd gotten myself into, but afterwards could laugh because it's all part of the adventure & now I have a really funny story.

Photo by Katie O’Connel

Photo by Katie O’Connel

Do you have any fun road trips planned? 

Currently, I'm recovering from a dirt bike crash so nothing official until I'm healed. However, I've always got ideas for adventures brewing.

Tell us about your experience at Babes Ride Out?

I attended the second year of babes ride out and a couple events since. Every one is a completely different experience & it's exactly what you make it. For me, it's about friendship & adventure. I've met so many of my best friends from going to BRO events. I would highly recommend every lady to check out at least one event.

Any advice for ladies who want to get started on two wheels?

Stop thinking about it and do it. Sign up for a course. Ask a friend who rides for help. Make the steps. You won't regret it!

Photo by Mikey Revolt

Photo by Mikey Revolt

Want to learn more about Harley-Davidson motos? Click HERE

Want to take one on a test ride? Click HERE

Artist Series | Babes Ride Out East Coast 4 | Stefanie Klempau

Artist SeriesAnya Violet

The Babes Ride Out Artist series showcases the art of talented people in our community. Each piece is donated to the Moto F.A.M. X Babes Ride Out raffle. Moto F.A.M.  is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping riders facing life changing injuries after a serious motorcycle accident. Meet Stefanie Klempau @fabricstattoo! She has hand painted this gorgeous Vegan Leather size small levis jacket for BRO East Coast 4 raffle. Read on to get to know more about Stephanie and her craft!

babes ride out

Where are you from originally?

I was born in Germany. My father is german and my mother is spanish

Where do you live now?

Now I live in Chile, South America where my parents grew up.

What first got you into art?

My mom was a great artist, and my sisters also painted a lot when they were little. There were a lot of drawing books at home and my mom helped me.

How would you describe your style?

My style is very perfectionist and realistic. I love color harmony, nothing to bright. Designs that blend perfectly with the environment. I think I got that from my mom too: stand out, but not too much. Always subtle.

babes ride out

What inspires you? Have any artists in particular been an influence on you?

When I was a teen I was very into Dali. I loved his fantasy designs, but with realistic drawing at the same time. I copied a lot of his work with pencil. But in general, I feel very inspired by nature. Nature is always balanced, harmonic and elegant. 

What is your favorite medium?

My favorite medium is the good old simple pencil: 2B. Simple black and white drawing. I have never been a fan of colors before I started painting on leather jackets. That was my biggest challenge. Actually, I wanted to do only white illustrations on black faux leather but I'm thankful that my customers made me use colors cause now I’m not afraid anymore. Color technique is not something easy when you have never taken a course of any kind. 

I have to say I don't like Oils, cause I when I was 15 I got intoxicated by the smell. LOL

When did you first hear about Babes Ride Out?

That was when I visited Los Angeles in February 2019 to meet a photographer who was into motorcycles. She saw my jackets and said I totally had to make something for this amazing show.

babes ride out

What is your connection to the motorcycle community?

Jackets. The cool, amazing jackets with fun designs, that moto cyclers use. 

If you were a motorcycle what kind would you be?

I would be a Cafe Racer, because I feel that my jackets would fit in perfectly in the concept. 

What will you be contributing to this years raffle? 

I will contribute a custom hand painted jacket. 

Tell us about what inspired you to create it?

I have been watching a lot of images and documentaries about motorcycles lately and I have so many ideas for the concept of women empowerment on a motorcycle. And in addition, your “camping” concept is even more inspiring. It's like “motorcycling under the stars”. Absolute and pure freedom. 

Check out my website. I mostly have done brides but am starting a whole new Motorcycle collection!!! https://www.fabricstattoo.com/

babes ride out

Say Hello to the Real Deal Revolution | Join them for their hand on demos at BRO East Coast 4

Sponsors, EventsAnya Violet

"Calling ALL BABES! It’s time to heat things up a bit at BRO East Coast. The Renegades of the Real Deal Revolution are coming in hot! This year at BRO East Coast in glorious Narrowsburg, New York, things are gonna get REAL!

Photo by Obsidian Photo

Photo by Obsidian Photo

Born of the desire to empower babes to get tools in their hands, the non-profit 501c3 Real Deal Revolution, is here to “Revolutionize the perception of skilled trades. . . . and women’s roles in them.” These Renegades are made up of a team of women that fabricate, forge, wrench, ride, wheel, and weld. And they’re looking for recruits.

They’re bringing their skills, talent and tools to BRO East and will be setting up shop to offer basic training custom paint, welding, moto talk and more. Their ‘pop-up’ shops at past BRO events have been in huge demand with lines out the doors. Clearly you don’t want to miss the Renegades in action. And remember, no previous experience required. Just a desire to work and learn.

RDR’s main goal is to get babes on a level where they feel comfortable maintaining and upgrading their own bikes. Through experience they’ve discovered that exposing these babes lifts the veil of intimidation, inspires confidence and pride in their accomplishments. They teach babes that it’s ok to get their hands dirty and that knowing how to use tools is sexy! Taking it one step further they want to encourage all babes to take a chance, enter the Real Deal Bike Show at BRO and share their stories of victory, share their style, share their progress.  

Photo by Obsidian Photo

Photo by Obsidian Photo

Founder Jessi Combs says it best, “We simply want to encourage and support women, because we truly believe that self empowerment comes from the ability to handle anything on your own, in any situation, no matter where you are. Our team lives and breathes that freedom daily and enjoys sharing how fulfilling that awesomeness really is. The vibe at BRO over the last few years gave a massive impression of what is really happening; it’s way more than just a ladies moto campout, it’s a revolution. We found ourselves compelled to be a part something so tangible and so on the forefront of morphing the way us women roll.

Check out the Renegades website at www.realdealrevolution.org for Real Deal Revolution merchandise, instructional workshoppe schedules, blog posts on Real Deal women, and to follow their journeys of inspiring more women to work creatively in the shop and play hard in life.

We look forward to sharing their skills with you again! Make sure to stop by their booth onsite, sign up for a workshoppe, pick up some tools, and add a new skill or two to your repertoire of awesomeness. Donations will also help fund future workshoppes and grow this revolution."

babes ride out



 

BRO East Coast 4 Maker | Ana Stone of Stonework Chainstitch Embroidery

Artist Series, EventsAnya Violet

Babes Ride Out will be hosting our Makers Market at BRO East Coast 4 this year. The BRO Makers Market is a curated group of female makers that will be on site showcasing their talents and  providing a unique experience for attendees. Meet Ana Stone of Stonework Chainstitch Embroidery

babes ride out
babes ride out

Ana Stone

Chainstitcher based in NY, NY

Ana creates custom and one off embroidery pieces

to ensure that you can wear something

that means something to you.

Each garment is carefully embroidered using an antique chainstitch machine operated by a free hand crank.

There are no computers involved, everything is by hand and how machine embroidery was done prior to computerization.

Pricing depends entirely on size, thickness, font used, and amount of color.

Ana also offers live, direct to garment chainstitching for any and all events. Selected clients include: Best Made Co, J. Crew, Nordstrom, Babes Ride Out, The Citizenry, CAT, Slow & Low, Garbstore, IMS Motorcycle Show, Gurls Talk, and many more

Megan Margeson and her 1964 Harley Davidson Panhead Chopper

PeopleAnya Violet

It’s pretty hard to miss Megan Margeson at our events! She usually rolls in with her mom, both of them on insanely cool choppers. She has even won a couple of awards for her bike at our events over the years. Megan comes from a true motorcycle family and we got to catch up with her to hear more about her 1964 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper and one of the best moto trips of her life. Read on to hear more.

babes ride out

Megan Margeson @MeganMargeson

What you do for a living? 

Middle School Science Teacher

How long have you been riding motorcycles and how did you get started? 

I got my first dirt bike when I was 7, rode on the back of my dad's Harley for the first time when I was 8, got my motorcycle license when I was 18, and finished building my bike when I was 23.

Why do you ride motorcycles / What do you get out of riding motorcycles? 

Motorcycles have always been something that my family did together. What started as family trips to the desert to go dirt bike riding (which still happens) has grown into 5,000 mile trips on our choppers. I think family is what makes motorcycles so important to me. While the feeling of riding is, of course, what keeps me getting on the bike, being able to share in these adventures with my family makes it even more special.

Run us through the list of bikes you have had in your past / currently own:

Past- Honda 70, Kawasaki KX 65, Kawasaki KX 85, Honda CRF 250R Current- 1964 Harley Davidson Panhead Chopper, 2002 Suzuki RM125, and a mini chopper

babes ride out

What first attracted you to Harley-Davidson? 

I was born into a Harley family. My dad got his 1949 Pan Shovel when I was 8, which was originally owned by my late uncle. Once I started riding on the back, I was immediately hooked. Shortly after, my mom purchased a Harley Davidson Heritage Classic. After riding that for a few years, she decided she wanted a chopper like my Dad's, so they started building her Shovelhead. Growing up, it was never a question as to 'if' I would ride but just a matter of 'when'. When I turned 18, I signed up for a motorcycle safety course and got my license. Once I started riding, my Dad said we could start building a chopper for me! About 6.5 years of building later, my chopper was complete!

How did you know it was the bike for you? 

I can't think of anything more special than having a bike that my dad built for me. The amount of love, sweat, and tears that went into this bike make it my most prized possession. We built it from the ground up, with me in mind every step of the way. I am more on the petite side and we built it to fit me perfectly. Since we built it, I was able to design every aspect of the bike: from the seat, to the sissy bar, to the paint, etc.

Tell us what it is like to ride your particular bike: 

I have ridden other types of bikes, but nothing has come close to my bike. Firstly, I am just very comfortable on my bike because it was built for me. Being comfortable is so important! Secondly, the feeling of a springer front end is my favorite! I just love hitting a bump in the road and feeling that bounce of the springer as I continue down the highway. It is a hardtail, so I am always sure to remember my kidney belt. While a bump in the road every now and then can be fun, going down the 405 freeway with no suspension can be quite painful.

babes ride out

What made you choose your model over the other H-D models? 

In all honesty, when we started building my bike, I wasn't going to be picky. I was just happy to be building a bike! My parents actually got the motor by trading their friend their old 1954 Chevy Truck for my panhead motor. I feel like when I say that, people assume I'm really spoiled (which... I guess I am, in a way). My Dad always said his goal was to build me a bike. He said he didn't have a lot to leave me with, but a bike was something he could do. Because money doesn't grow on trees at my house, it took us about 6.5 years to build my bike. I'm not complaining by any means. If anything, it made me appreciate it that much more.

Any modifications? Tell us about them if so:

Since we built it, pretty much everything can be considered a modification. I designed the king and queen style seat with Danny Grey, even had memory foam and gel put into it... worth every penny! The mustang tank, custom fender, and wishbone frame were painted by Chris Morrison, Richard LaPorte, and Dennis Babin. I wanted the bike to be period correct, so I tried to make design choices to reflect that, as well as South Bay Chopper history. The 13' over Fat's springer front end, "South Bay Swoop" style sissy bar, stainless steel auxiliary gas tank, and Dick Allen two-into-one exhaust are all elements of "old-school South Bay" choppers.

What has been you favorite adventure you have taken on your bike? 

Last Summer, my parents and I took a 5,000 mile trip to Canada. We went up the coast from Torrance, CA up into Canada, down through Idaho, stopped by Sturgis, went all the way down to New Mexico, and back up to California. We had a few bike issues along the way, which just adds to the adventure. Riding old bikes means that break downs are inevitable. We come as prepared as possible and do our best to keep up on maintenance, but things shake loose and pieces wear down. Breaking down multiple times just reminded me how wonderful the Harley Davidson community truly is. Three different strangers invited us into their homes to work on the bikes. A tow truck driver, who happens to be Harley rider, gave us a ridiculous deal on the tow. One man in Montana let my dad borrow his bike while my dad's was taken apart. Another man let us borrow one of his tools and just asked that we mail it back to him once we get home. Phil and Lydia of Cycle Works in Lynwood, CA overnighted us a Shovelhead head to borrow so that we could make it home! And countless riders stopped on the side of the road to make sure we were okay. When I begin to lose faith in humanity, the motorcycle community is there to remind me that good people still exist!

babes ride out

Do you have any fun road trips planned? 

This coming Summer, my parents and I will be riding up to Alaska and across through Canada!

Tell us about your experience at Babes Ride Out? (if you have not attended, tell us what you are looking forward to the most): 

When people ask me what Babes Ride Out is like, I find it so difficult to put the experience into words. It is the most liberating experience. It is the one place in the whole world that I feel I can go and not a single soul is judging me. We ride together during the day, and dance like no one is watching by night. Every woman there is so, incredibly supportive and we are all there because we have a mutual love that we can connect with: motorcycles. I finished building my bike the night before Babes Ride Out 2017. It was my goal to be able to take its maiden voyage to Joshua Tree for the event and put it in the Real Deal Bike Show. Not only did I make it there with no issues, I took home Best Vintage Bike and People's Choice! Could not have picked a better place to take our first ride together. Babes Ride Out is a safe place where I can sit at a random table and eat dinner with women I have never met and by the end of the meal, feel as if I had known them forever. When I'm out in public and see a woman in a Babes Ride Out hat, I always run up and introduce myself. Even though we have never met, the experience of BRO unites us. Babes Ride Out isn't just a campout, its a community.

Any advice for ladies who want to get started on two wheels?

TAKE A SAFETY COURSE!! Since I had been riding dirt bikes my whole life, I didn't see the need in taking a riding course. However, since I was under 21, the state of California required I did and I am so thankful for that! To this day, I think back to techniques I learned in the course while I am out riding. It not only strengthened my riding abilities but taught me what to do in unsafe situations.

babes ride out