Babes Ride Out

BRO5 | A 3 Day Love Affair With the Triumph Thruxton

REVIEWSAnya Violet
 Photo by Tamara Raye for Motorcycle.com

Photo by Tamara Raye for Motorcycle.com

I have had my eye on the Triumph Thruxton ever since it was first released. A major redesign in 2016 introduced us to upgraded suspension and brakes and the body styling also has a new look. I’m not going to lie, I am pretty shallow when it comes to motorcycles and am easily dazzled by a good lookin’ bike. Before you turn the key and you hear the growl of the engine all you have to go off of is looks. Well, the Thruxton is a looker for sure! It would wink at me from across the room at the local dealerships. The sleek aerodynamic lines and upswept exhaust give the bike an overall more aggressive personality, even a bit cocky one might say. I think the allure came because I could really visualize myself on the bike just by looking at it. Entire riding fantasies of twisty back roads and deep turns filled my head before I even sat on it. Ok ok, enough about the looks. I finally got the opportunity to ride this beast at Babes Ride Out 5!!!

I was a little nervous, like a first date. Maybe because it was actually my first time on a Thruxton all together and the Thruxton name is about as legendary as it gets.  In 1951, the once Royal Air Force base (Thruxton Airfield) became a civilian airfield and was established to host 6 motorcycle race events as a part of the Festival of Britain. A 1.9 mile circuit became home to 15 years of legendary racing that afforded Triumph 19 out of 45 podium places over the years. The Thruxton model started as a souped-up race version of the Bonneville but in May of 1965 the first batch rolled off the production line.  The Thruxton name is synonymous with Triumph’s racing success throughout generations and here it was, the latest and greatest sitting in the driveway. It was like a blind date where your friend hypes up the dude so much that you have no option but to be semi-disappointed when you meet him. Well, I was not!

Being a Bonneville rider I was expecting a bit of an adjustment as I got comfortable with the more aggressive race position on the bike. Lower handlebars and rear sets had me positioned in a way that you feel a lot more at one with the bike which I liked instantly. Turning the key and firing it up, I was impressed to hear a more rich bass exhaust sound that only added to my excitement. I took off through Joshua Tree in search of a stretch of uninhabited backroad where I could open it up. That wasn’t hard to find and a with a twist of the throttle I could feel the thrill encompass my whole body. I sensed myself going in to the adrenaline fueled head space that comes during a race. Yes, it is up to the rider to push the bike to its limits during a race but isn’t the bikes job to inspire the rider to push themselves just as hard. While I am having this nostalgic and extremely nerdy moment with the Thruxton I realized that I am not racing, I am just cruising down a desert road and I need to chill.

Throughout the weekend I was constantly in search of winding roads with great turns and wide open straightaways. The Thruxton is extremely agile with sharp handling no matter what the road throws at you, even in a little bit of dirt. The bike feels stable and with 1200 cc’s worth of power and 6 gears it left nothing to be desired. This is the kind of bike that may or may not kill your romantic relationships because you just would rather hang out with it than anyone else. It understands you and is there for you no matter what kind of mood you’re in. All jokes aside, the Thruxton is the kind of bike that pushes you to ride faster and harder than you normally do. At least, that’s what it did for me. I had the most fun on it when I was riding solo and able to ride at whatever pace I felt like. I am already looking forward to my second date with the Thruxton R. I think we really have something together.   

To read more about the Triumph Thruxton  click HERE

To test ride the Thruxton  at your local dealer click HERE

 photo by Heidi Zumbrun

photo by Heidi Zumbrun

 photo by Heidi Zumbrun

photo by Heidi Zumbrun