Babes Ride Out

Getting Lost Isn't a Thing Anymore | A Day Riding Connected Through the Catskills with Sena

REVIEWS, Riding Routes, SponsorsAshmore Ellis

Riding in new territory, especially the Catskills, when roads often have multiple names since they were forged hundreds of years ago can be a nightmare. Thankfully we had our Senas with us to make the route a breeze. Read on to see where we wandered during Babes Ride Out East Coast 3. 

 Setting up and synching our Senas

Setting up and synching our Senas

After we selected our destination for the day, Dundas Castle, we synced up our Sena Bluetooth sets, tapped in the directions, and felt confident we'd make it to our destination, first stop, world famous Roscoe Diner for lunch. 

 Best diner in NY! Roscoe's Famous Diner

Best diner in NY! Roscoe's Famous Diner

Babes Ride Out East Coast

The roads were a little  bet up from the harsh winter the east coast had received. Our ride lead was able to communicate dangers well in advance. 

Potholes.JPG
Babes Ride Out East Coast

Once we made it to Roscoe we enjoyed one of the best diner experiences. With a full stomach we were bound and determined to find the infamous Dundas Castle. The area the castle is located is thick with trees, so much in fact you can't see the stones of the house because it blends in so seamlessly with it's environment. Even with directions, we got lost. The best part about it is that even though we split up from the group to try and located this place, we were able to stay synced to our group via Sena Bluetooth.

 If you are going to get turned around... this is a great place to do it! 

If you are going to get turned around... this is a great place to do it! 

 Being able to communicate "where should we go next" is simply the best

Being able to communicate "where should we go next" is simply the best

Being able to stay connected, even when lost, was a true blast. Once we decided to turn around and head in a different direction, we quickly came up on the castle. Of course it was in the last diection we tried. 

 Dundas Castle is a historic house in Roscoe, New York modeled after Dundas Castle. It is also known as "Craig-E-Clare". It was built between 1915 and 1924 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2001.

Dundas Castle is a historic house in Roscoe, New York modeled after Dundas Castle. It is also known as "Craig-E-Clare". It was built between 1915 and 1924 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2001.

Finding our way winding through the Catskills was a blast and it was even more sharing instant laughs, "look outs", and jokes along the way. Cheers to staying connected!

Photos By: Maddy Talias

Babes in Borrego & The Original 50 | Meet Melanie Lucia

PeopleAnya Violet

It takes a sense of adventure to ride out on your motorcycle to meet up with a bunch of other riders you have never met and camp at an undisclosed location. Melanie found the adventure she was looking at a pivotal time in her life when she went to Babes in Borrego back in 2013. Read on to hear more about her story and what she has been up to over the past 5 years. 

babes ride out
babes ride out

On October 5th 2013, 50 women rode out to an undisclosed location for a night of camping and camaraderie. What would follow could not have been predicted by anyone. The positivity, passion and enthusiasm for those 50 women has fueled the growth and exposure of a community that has meant so much to so many. We are highlighting each of those 50 women and sharing their stories over the past 5 years. 


 Melanie Lucia


babes ride out

• Melanie Lucia

•  @hellsmels

• San Diego

• Hair dresser 

How did you find out about Babes in Borrego and what made you want to be a part of it?

I was invited to Babes in Borrego by a chick I met at a co-ed roller derby scrimmage. I had never ridden with chicks before, and she was a bad ass on the track, so I couldn’t say no! I got my first motorcycle when I was 21 and always rode with the guys. It only took 7 years to be invited to ride with some ladies, I was looking forward to it. 

When you arrived at the meet up, what was your first thoughts? 

It was pretty intimidating!  It was also very inspiring. I think 8-10 bikes left the first meet up.  I had NEVER seen that many girls on bikes in one place at the same time.  Riding into the meet up in Temecula blew my mind. Women from every direction were pulling into that gas station on motorcycles.  When I heard there were 50, I couldn’t believe it!!

Did you know anyone there?

I didn’t really know anyone, I had met Machine at roller derby, once!  Then met a couple of her friends in the morning on the way to the first meet up. Later on that evening, I did run into a couple friends from San Diego by the camp fire!  

Is going on an adventure solo like this something you do or was this a first time out of your element kind of thing?

A few months before Babes, I was going through a divorce and riding my bike was awesome therapy. I hopped on my old sportster and rode up to San Francisco. Solo. I had done a few longer trips, but not alone. 

To go to something like this and the destination be unknown is kind of crazy.  What did you think of riding with all those ladies and of the destination?

Riding with all of the ladies out to Borrego was sooooo fun. That hill going down Montezuma hwy, hauling a$$ with chicks that knew how to ride....AMAZING!

Now, the dirt road heading out to the dry lakebed...that’s a different story. I had just bought my dyna, which is way heavier than my old sporty.  That dirt road was a nightmare. I saw spilled bikes and burnt legs. But we all made it!

What was that one night like for you? Tell us about your experience. 

Borrego was so cool. Ripping around the dry lakebed. Was this the year we brought the baby pool?!  S’mores.  Apple pie moonshine. Meeting tons of fun new people.  Massive campfire. Fireworks!!  

Tell us about the ladies you met and have your friendships have evolved over the past 5 years. Do you keep in touch?

Machine, T-bone and Genevieve were the crew I rode with to the first meet up. Thanks to roller derby for putting me in the right place at the right time! Since then Machine and I went to Seattle for roller derby national champs and have camped at multiple Babes Rides together! 

I remember meeting Jackie and Daniella at a gas station...or Carlees?  Daniella was the only other chick on a dyna, she was instantly cool. It took me about 6 months to find her on Instagram, only to realize she was the one that took a ton of killer photos that weekend.   

Rachel (or Brooklyn) and I met in between Long Beach and Temecula. Her saddle bag was open, after flagging her down then having to haul ass to catch back up with the crew, I knew we’d get along.  She was my campfire buddy, even threw my s’mores in the fire.  She came to San Diego 2 years ago and we got to party in Mexico for the night!!

How have you changed over the past 5 years? 

5 years ago I was going through a divorce. Rebuilding my life back in San Diego. Now I’m working with a group of awesome girlfriends.  I’ve gotten to travel a lot, meet tons of new people. Go on awesome adventures with my amazing super supportive boyfriend. Life can’t be better! 

Have you gone on any more camping / riding trips since that 2013 ride? If so, where and with who? 

I rode up to Portland with Jackie, Genevieve, Chelsea, Daniella and Mitch. We camped and rode all up the PCH then shot over to Portland. Big Sur, Avenue Of the Giants, Oregon coast! We hit a ton of skateparks on that trip too. A skateboard fits perfectly between the bars and fairing! 

Bandit town one year for the 4th of July was a long fun ride and camp. Actually, the camp sucked, I hadn’t bought a good sleeping pad yet!  But the ride was beautiful, and hot.  Rode through Yosemite and watched fireworks at Bass lake. 

El Diablo run counts right?!  Riding then camping in San Felipe!! 

I was able to do the first Babes Ride Out UK!  Another trip that I joined knowing nobody!  About a week before getting to London, Andrea Dosouto asked if she could make the trip on the back of my rental bike. I was a little nervous renting a bigger bike (heritage softail), having a passenger AND riding on the opposite side of the road! That ride was a dream! I made that trip a huge loop of the UK. After riding through Wales with the girls I headed north solo and got to visit a good friend up in Scotland and meet a ton of awesome people along the way. Ps, the rain suits that come with Harley rentals in London ONLY fit XL men!!  

What is it like coming back to Babes Ride Out as it has grown? 

It’s sooooo different coming back to Babes!  I meet new people every year.  Some years there’s so much going on that I don’t run into people that I was hoping to see from previous years, but everyone is having a good time. It’s nice having food trucks and not having to bring tons of food, although we do anyway because it’s fun to cook over a campfire! 


 

 

 

Meet Cassie Bennitt @miss_lola_mae | She learned to ride with VC London

PeopleAnya Violet

Our Friends at VC London have helped several women learn to ride over the years! We are excited to help support their efforts at Camp VC this year by helping to sponsor the "new-to-motorcycle" training classes. Seeing all of the new riders was such an inspiration for us! Meet Cassie and read her story on how she found her way to motorcycles with a little help from VC London!

 Photo by  @spinalsnapshack

Name: Cassie Bennitt

Instagram Handle: @miss_lola_mae

Location: London

Where are you from and where do you live? I’m from St Agnes in sunny Cornwall and I live in East London.

What inspired you to want to ride a motorcycle? My family has always been in to classic cars and my Dad has ridden bikes since he was 16. He’s not getting any younger and he has arthritis (just like Clay from ‘Sons of Anarchy’, except not mean and scary) so I decided to learn to ride so that I could ride with him before he hangs up his leathers.

How did you first find out about VC London? My friend was badgering me about doing my CBT for ages and I kept procrastinating and putting it off. Then he messaged me that VC London were doing their first all-female CBT so I booked in straight away and the rest is history.

Tell us about your experience learning to ride with VC? Gemma and Mai invited me to a practice session the night before my CBT. I was really nervous (because I had only been on a scooter about 10 years before and it was a DISASTER) but the girls were so supportive that I forgot my nerves, got on with it and just had fun.  

Was it harder or easier than you thought? It was far easier than I thought it was going to be.  

Were you intimidated? Not in the slightest.

Do you practice you skills often just to stay sharp on your bike? Yes I do and I want to do my advanced riding course later this year. To quote my Dad, ‘it’s a warzone out there for bikers’ so I want to do everything I can to make sure I ride safely.

Tell us about the first time you went to Camp VC? I’ve been going to Camp since it began. First up I signed up as a volunteer – I was fresh into riding and didn’t know that many people so I figured that if I didn’t get talking to anyone, at least I would be kept busy. Turns out that I needn’t have worried because everyone was so friendly and I made friends for life.

What are your favorite memories from the event? I have so many great memories from each year, it’s hard to pick just one. I think it has to be a general one - waking up in the morning to a beautiful view, riding all day with a bunch of kick ass, fabulous women and coming back and partying and comparing stories from the day’s adventures. Oh and Namin climbing in the giant fridge after we had drunk a LOT of rum. That was classic. Definitely a fun memory.

How has learning to ride changed your life? Riding has introduced me to some amazing people and it’s taken me all over the world. I only wish I’d learned to ride sooner.  

What are your goals as a motorcyclist? To ride safe, have fun and travel the world on two wheels. Also, after my first little race at the Malle Mile, I want to do more racing.

What advice do you have for others who are new to riding or thinking about learning to ride? Just get out there and do it. It will change your life and I promise it’s nowhere near as scary as you think it might be.

It's Cool | The Triumph Motorcycles Bonneville Bobber

REVIEWS, SponsorsAnya Violet
 Photo By Maddy Talias

Photo By Maddy Talias

Every kind of motorcycle appeals to different people for different reasons. So many things factor in to the final decision of which bike you choose to make your own. I have been lucky enough to get to ride a fairly wide variety of Triumph Motorcycles over the past few years and they all inspire a certain kind of riding and make you feel a certain kind of way. I got to spend some time on the Speed Triple when I was in the UK and that made me feel super fast and nimble and inspired a more aggressive style of riding.  The Street Scrambler is so light and has plenty of power so I cannot help but want to find me a fire road to explore. Well recently I was able to ride the new Triumph Bonneville Bobber Black  through the Catskills on the East Coast.

The term “Bobber” refers to the stripped back style of motorcycle that was originally called a “bob-Job”. The rigid frame and shortened wheel base results in a lower, shorter machine. Like many styles of bike, the inspiration came from the race bikes of the 1930’s and was taken to the streets in the garages and shops of the average rider. The custom scene grabbed a hold of these “bob-job” style bikes and made it their own, as they do. Popular in the Hot Rod scene and always reflecting a home-built modified aesthetic; it wasn’t until the 1990’s that a commercially produced Bobber style motorcycle hit the market.

 Photo by Maddy Talias

Photo by Maddy Talias

Here we are in 2018 with this lean mean Bobber version of the Bonneville from Triumph Motorcycles. The stats are all HERE if you want to geek out. Walking up to this bike for the first time it dawned on me that I had never actually rode a rigid frame motorcycle. The Triumph Bobber does have a mono-shock suspension so it is not truly a rigid bike but it still has that sweeping diagonal line between the steering head and the rear axle.  The low seat height was pretty nice and definitely one of  the first things I noticed once I sat on it. The forward controls took a minute for me to get used to, as always. Overall the bike was really comfortable.

As we took off for the ride to a haunted castle ( standard Catskills kind of adventure ) I realized how cool I felt on that bike. I know that is an extremely uncool thing to say, but it’s true. I felt cool. There is something about the stretched out body positioning that looks like you are just rippin’ without a care in the world. The blacked out paint job is pretty bad ass and the 1200 cc motor leaves nothing to be desired. No matter where we stopped ( a diner, a gas station, roadside ) people would come over to check out the bike and have all kinds of questions. This definitely added to the “me feeling cool” factor. I personally really dig that there is not really an option for a back seat. This bike is for one rider and one rider only which I think is pretty damn sweet. It’s about your own independence. I had an absolute blast on this bike.

I know that many people ride motorcycles for many different reasons. They are dangerous and the decision to ride can not to be taken lightly. Motorcycles can fill your life with so much thrill and excitement.  I cannot bring myself to believe that looking cool is not at least a tiny bit part of it for nearly everyone, whether they admit it or not.  I would be lying if I said that I didn’t feel cool even if maybe I don’t look cool on nearly every bike that I have ridden. This does not make up the vast majority of the reason I choose to ride but I'm sure it's in there. There is nothing wrong with feeling cool on a motorcycle, as long as you have the skill, training and responsibility to go with it. Cool is a state of mind anyway isn’t it?

 Photo by Maddy Talias

Photo by Maddy Talias

If you want to know more about the Triumph Bonneville Bobber you can click HERE

To find a dealer near you and test ride click HERE

Babes in Borrego & The Original 50 | Meet Beulah Mae

PeopleAnya Violet
 Photo by Daniella Renee

Photo by Daniella Renee

babes ride out

On October 5th 2013, 50 women rode out to an undisclosed location for a night of camping and camaraderie. What would follow could not have been predicted by anyone. The positivity, passion and enthusiasm for those 50 women has fueled the growth and exposure of a community that has meant so much to so many. We are highlighting each of those 50 women and sharing their stories over the past 5 years. 


Beulah Mae


·       NAME - Beulah Mae

·       INSTAGRAM HANDLE - @bornmean

·       LOCATION - Lake Elsinore CA

·       OCCUPATION - housewife/hustler

How did you find out about Babes in Borrego and what made you want to be a part of it?

---- I saw one post on Facebook from my friend Sandra, I had been riding for just over 6 months and mostly by myself. I never really had the opportunity to meet and ride with other women like me. My husband didn't ride at the time and I was too intimidated to go to most events by myself. Everyone has their biker costumes on and you can't tell which women were riders until they got on their bikes and then it was too late because they were riding home. Not that I would have run up and said "Hey, let's be freinds!!!" This campout for sure felt like it was the place to do just that.

When you arrived at the meet up, what was your first thoughts?

--- I underestimated the scene before I got there, I was still in "mom" mode at the time and I actually had my husband follow me up with a dispenser full of ice water just in case you girls were thirsty.

Did you know anyone there? Is going on an adventure solo like this something you do or was this a first time out of your element kind of thing?

--- I did not know a single person. My friend Sandra who posted about it in the first place wasn't able to go and I just wasn't going to let that stop me. I was WAAAAYYYY out of my comfort zone. I showed up with a motorcycle and a smile. I wasn't on IG so I was just following along from the FB event and the emails you sent out. I think that was probably what convinced me, seeing the kind of women that were responding with those first blog posts, it was intimidating but inspiring. I had NO IDEA what to expect or what I was in for. I had never even been on a group ride before.

To go to something like this and the destination be unknown is kind of crazy.  What did you think of riding with all those ladies and of the destination?

--- There are a few moments that stick out. When we left the Starbucks parking lot, I just got in line and tried to stay in position. The first moment that felt like I was in the middle of some real biker shit was when we all pulled over to regroup after getting separated at the lights and a few women pulled out to block the traffic so we could all get going in one group. I felt protected by these strangers. (I just got a little verklempt, that just hit me really weird right now) The next super memorable moment was cresting the hill on S22 and heading down in to Borrego Springs, I think I've been on that road once before but not on my bike. It's a whole different experience, seeing the desert and the Salton Sea, it was pretty amazing. Those are the views I now cherish when I'm riding to new places, coming up over a hill and not knowing what is on the other side.  - I also remember the last gas stop before heading to camp and Ashmore was in front of me and her dude Mike "happened" to be  there (I'm really curious to know what he thinks of the event since he's seen it grow from Borrego) and Ashmore said to him "God babe, get out of here, you're so embarrassing!"

What was that one night like for you? Tell us about your experience.

--- I was familiar with the area, I camp with my family out in Truck Haven so I knew what I would be in for as far as the weather and what the camping conditions would be. I can't really remember who I started talking with first, we were all just sort of shooting the shit with whoever was standing next to you at the time. There was no template back then, not for me at least. Everyone I met seemed very genuine, down to earth and excited to be there. I made it down that sandy road in to camp, set up my tent and then was just kind of in awe watching everyone ride around, laughing, the sun was going down, I mean it was the most perfect weather you could ask for out there. I brought a couple bottle rockets with me so after it got dark and everyone was kind of gathered around the fire it seemed like a good time to shoot them off. After that Lindsey said she knew she had to talk to me because I came prepared. I was really happy she adopted me that night and I ended up riding home with that group of ladies she came with: Caroline, Britt and Ana and we had breakfast in Temecula the next morning, I think Rebecca had breakfast with us too but wasn't riding, she came in her truck.

Tell us about the ladies you met and have your friendships have evolved over the past 5 years.  Do you keep in touch?

--- Lindsey was probably the most important person I met that night, it turned out that she knew my husband from living in San Clemente and we had some mutual friends - it was just too weird to not remain friends. I don't see her often enough but I do try to keep in touch. I met a lot of other women afterwards, connecting through social media. We would ride together or see each other at events. I definitely have made very strong friendships with a few other ladies, some friendships fizzled out and other friendships are just a logistical issue of trying to find time to meet up, but I am always happy to spend the time that I get with them.

How have you changed over the past 5 years? (jobs, relationship, location, family, feel free to tell us as little or much as you want here).

--- Well the first big change was starting my IG account, and now I can't remember what came first the IG handle or the knuckle tattoos. Big changes.... When I wrote my first intro to you I was a carpooling mom of a couple of boy scouts and now I have one son who has been in the Navy for 2 years, and another son who just graduated high school and is heading in to the Army.  Since the campout I was lucky enough to be part of the group that started Belles On Bikes, the aim was to meet and connect other female riders the same way you guys did at Babes In Borrego, show up, make friends. I am now also co-hosting a podcast called Girl On A Moto with my friend Connie, just another way to be involved and also learn more about our moto community. I have only been riding for about 5 years now and still have a lot to learn, but I also feel like I have a lot to offer as far as supporting people in the community or encouraging people to get a bike and ride. I know for sure I have inspired my family, my mom got her M1 and a Honda Rebel and rides out to BRO with me, my oldest son got his M1 and we got to ride together a few times before he left for the Navy and my husband recently got a bike and we are looking forward to taking trips together once our last little birdie leaves the nest.

Have you gone on any more camping / riding trips since that 2013 ride? If so, where and with who?

--- Yup!! Plenty, and I've even planned a few campouts with Belles on Bikes. Our last campout we had 38 girls ride up to Palomar for a night of fun and games. I've been through Nevada, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona on my bike with a few girls I met in Borrego and through Belles. I went up the coast with my friend Joyce, we saw a concert in Santa Cruz and then camped in Sequoia. I went to Dream Roll last year. I've taken a solo trip to Big Sur, I've been to every Babes Ride Out event. In 5 years I've put over 50,000 miles on my bike.

What is it like coming back to Babes Ride Out as it has grown? 

--- I love it, it's close to home and all my friends are there. Every year the accommodations get nicer and the event is more thoughtful, it feels like every concern is met and then some. If you go to Babes and can't have a good time, I hate to break it to you, but you're an asshole, and if you're not an asshole then don't be afraid to have fun! That's why we're all there.

What are your thoughts on the Moto community and industry as a whole?

--- I don't know man,  my community is awesome. I try to avoid nonsense and be supportive and find people that are supportive of me. There are things in society that bother me in an equal way that there are things in parts of the moto community that just aren’t for me, so I try to avoid those situations. I don't go anywhere asking for trouble, riding my motorcycle is my happy place and I want to find and to spread as much happiness as I can in to my life and this hobby.

 

 

 

Babes Ride Out 6 Official After Party | Sunday October 21st | Saguaro Hotel Palm Springs

EventsAnya Violet

BABES & DUDES!!! Come out for a day at the pool after a fun weekend in the desert. The Saguaro Hotel is offering a special rate for rooms to Babes Ride Out guests only. Book now before the rooms fill up. See you there!

Click HERE to book your room

Click HERE to see direction from the campsite to the Saguaro

If you have any questions please call the Saguaro at Phone: (760) 323-1711